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 Post subject: Bond assessments
PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 5:26 pm 
Can anyone tell me what the ages mean on the bond assessments. Does age 7-8 mean Year 2 or Year 3, or is it to do with your age rather than year group? DS2 (Year 3 and age 8) currently working through age 7-8 NVR, VR & Maths and hopefully he'll get onto age 8-9 next week. I'd hate to think that even age 8-9 was for an average child because then we are in trouble! :(


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 5:27 pm 
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they mean the age in years.

edit: but use it according to what you want him to cover.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 5:32 pm 
But how can that be because how can an 8 year old in Year 3 have covered the same stuff as an 8 year old in Year 4. If he is doing an 8+ (Year 4) entry test, what one should he be using?


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 6:09 pm 
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My children at the beginning of Yr 5 had covered the last book 10-11 comfortably.
I used it mainly as a gauge to see what they could do.
A friend's daughter only started working on 10-11 in the summer hols(end of Yr 5) before exams and did not find them difficult. She passed all her exams, including independents.

I would say that if he did the 8-9 and got good scores, he would be in the running. But if you know the schools he's trying for and have past year papers, you might be able to gauge it better.

Friends who have gone through the exams prior to mine have said to aim for the higher book (in your case 8-9) ..this applies only to Bond Books which seemed very popular as a teaching aid along our way. So much of it wasn't relevant to some of the state Entrance exams they did but it was helpful for the prep for independents.

The general point is that if a child can handle the higher papers comfortably, he will do better in the tests..It's a little difficult to say more than that as I don't know what type of exams (school's own/some other recognised board)your son is taking.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 6:27 pm 
Thanks AB! :shock: :wink:

Unfortunately I do not know what they are looking for because the schools do not give past papers and I don't know anyone who has sat for it before. One school will assess his spelling and reading age and then say if he can enter but to get any scholarship he then needs to sit the scholarship paper. The other schools are basically just for entry but are very competitive and like some GS will take the top marks.

I've looked at the 8-9 Maths and it will be a struggle for him. NVR should be fine but I'm not sure now about English. Bless him I think he's being overloaded which will mean he doesn't retain anything. I wonder if they'll take into account his IQ report even if he does poorly on the tests? :? Is 137 impressive? I have no idea because I always compare it to DS1! :(


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 6:47 pm 
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Joined: Fri Nov 17, 2006 8:54 pm
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Location: caversham
Quote:
Is 137 impressive? I have no idea because I always compare it to DS1!


Hi Tipsy,

I am surprised that you have not researched this score. :roll:

Quote:
The IQ test is scored so that the mean score is 100 and the distribution has the shape of a Gaussian function, with a standard deviation of 15. The plot shows the percentage of people getting a score versus the score itself, from 55 to 145 IQ, i.e. (145-55)/15 = 6 times the standard deviation. Lengths as long as the standard deviation are represented with different colors. In order to create it, first I ran the following Octave code:


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:IQ_curve.svg

Of course wiki and one off IQ scores can be unreliable.

Focus on exam technique, doing it on the day. :)

Good luck and best wishes.


steve


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 6:53 pm 
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I feel for you! :shock:( for all Tipsy & AB watchers, this is not the beginning of a beautiful relationship!!)

I don't know your son and only have an inkling that this is a sudden and unexpected deviation from your many plans.

However you know and I know, cramming can have a big downside - catastrophic loss of confidence.

If it was me, I would just be checking he knows his basic operations very well for Maths and let the English be taken care of by talking a lot this week. Maybe learn new topics only with lots of little breaks and treats and help him to stay calm by not mentioning the word, "You've got this Wrong!"

It's a bit late in the day but if you get yourself organised and do it in chunks, he and you might survive the holidays.

The only other thing would be to put all your trust in his innate abilities and let him fly on his own wings.

Where are all the tutors when you need them?

AB


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 7:19 pm 
Steve - I honestly hadn't researched IQ because as far as I'm concerned it means nothing unless you can "deliver the goods" in the classroom. Of course I will try and convince the schools it means something. By the way I didn't understand any of that quote :oops: - in dumb English please!

AB you are right! :shock: Today was a bit better - he got 30/30 so maybe won't be as worried when he does more maths tomorrow! :? DS2 is unpredictable though! :(


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 7:39 pm 
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Joined: Fri Nov 17, 2006 8:54 pm
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Location: caversham
Tipsy,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IQ_reference_chart

130-144 Moderately Gifted

I would say very very bright in the top few percent of the population.

But agree it's what they do on the day so focus on exam technique and confidence. :)

steve


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 8:21 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jan 25, 2008 10:18 pm
Posts: 273
Do the schools you have applied for ask for a headteacher's report?

We talked to a HM at a senior school and he basically said that if the child got low results on the day that they would speak to the child's current Head teacher to ascertain previous scores etc to see whether they had just had a bad day. They took into account all factors ie exam performance. head teachers report and interview performance before they awarded a place.

Would the school you have applied to operate in the same way or are they purely exam results based?


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