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PostPosted: Fri Oct 12, 2012 3:56 pm 
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Currently Leighton park school offers following subjects in GCSE

CORE: English, Maths, Briefs and Values (RS), PE and Games(not examined), Your life(not examined) and CAS projects (Creativity, Action and Service)

OPTIONAL: Approaches to learning,Art and Design,Biology,Chemistry,Design Technology,Drama,English as a second language,French,Geography,German,History,Information Technology (EDCL qualification), Latin, Mandarin,Music,Physical Education,Physics,Spanish and Textile Design

My worry is that, generally CORE contains 2 or 3 Sciences in most of the schools but here it is not the case though they can be taken from optional route.

Is this something I need to bother?

Also, English Literature and Additional Mathematics are neither in CORE nor in Optional. Will it impact if child wants to do his/her graduation in Maths

PLEASE HELP


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 12, 2012 9:12 pm 
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Generally when you pick your options there are certain restrictions, so they probably have to do 2 our 3 sciences, it's just presented differently.

English in Core undoubtedly includes English Language and English Literature.

Additional maths - not necessary. There are a lot of maths people (teachers and mathematicians) who don't think there's any advantage in doing maths gcse early, and so if you don't, no need for anything additional.

But best to ask the school, not us, I expect!


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 13, 2012 7:44 am 
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Science is compulsory at KS4, so unless the school has added in a clause that students must choose at least one science, they would be breaking the law. As Aliportico says, I imagine that clause is in there somewhere.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 13, 2012 12:55 pm 
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Thank you for posting this question. I hope that we can clear this up. I am in fact the Head at Leighton Park School.
Our core English includes both Language and Literature as two separate full GCSE examinations, as a previous respondent has suggested. Additional Maths is also unnecessary, but we do have extension available for the most gifted mathematicians. Science is not optional, but the three sciences are all given as options. Each student must study one or more sciences as full GCSEs. We do not offer dual award Science ( two thirds of each of the three sciences, leading to two GCSE qualifications), because we want our scientists to have the option of doing all three science GCSE courses in their entirety, and gaining three qualifications. Meanwhile, we want students who are not particularly scientific to be able to pursue other options should they so wish. This means that they can do one full science GCSE. Most of our students choose two or three options at Science.
Our recent ISI inspection cited our curricular provision as "excellent". The strength of it is the flexibility which we can offer as an independent school. It is also worth noting that every single one of our students who sought entry to university last summer was successful, with all but two attaining their first or second choice. Please do visit the school or ask any further questions you may have. We would be delighted to welcome you.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 13, 2012 3:16 pm 
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amcgrath wrote:
Thank you for posting this question. I hope that we can clear this up. I am in fact the Head at Leighton Park School.
Our core English includes both Language and Literature as two separate full GCSE examinations, as a previous respondent has suggested. Additional Maths is also unnecessary, but we do have extension available for the most gifted mathematicians. Science is not optional, but the three sciences are all given as options. Each student must study one or more sciences as full GCSEs. We do not offer dual award Science ( two thirds of each of the three sciences, leading to two GCSE qualifications), because we want our scientists to have the option of doing all three science GCSE courses in their entirety, and gaining three qualifications. Meanwhile, we want students who are not particularly scientific to be able to pursue other options should they so wish. This means that they can do one full science GCSE. Most of our students choose two or three options at Science.
Our recent ISI inspection cited our curricular provision as "excellent". The strength of it is the flexibility which we can offer as an independent school. It is also worth noting that every single one of our students who sought entry to university last summer was successful, with all but two attaining their first or second choice. Please do visit the school or ask any further questions you may have. We would be delighted to welcome you.


Thankyou Sir, for your kind information. Will certainly meet you soon


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 13, 2012 3:57 pm 
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Amber wrote:
Science is compulsory at KS4, so unless the school has added in a clause that students must choose at least one science, they would be breaking the law.


I thought the requirement for science at KS4 was a national curriculum issue, not an Education Act issue?


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 13, 2012 4:07 pm 
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http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Parents/Sch ... G_10013877

Suppose it depends how you define the word 'statutory'. Perhaps I misunderstand it, but to me that means it's compulsory by statute, and a statute is a written law. Semantics, I think. Kids in KS4 have to study science, and most schools take the view that this should include Physics, Chemistry and Biology, whether as dual award or triple award. This school is doing things rather differently, but is clearly still within the 'statutory requirements' of the Key stage.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 13, 2012 4:19 pm 
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Amber wrote:
http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Parents/Schoolslearninganddevelopment/ExamsTestsAndTheCurriculum/DG_10013877

Suppose it depends how you define the word 'statutory'. Perhaps I misunderstand it, but to me that means it's compulsory by statute,


It's compulsory for state schools to offer the NC. The school in question isn't a state school. Hence my question: I don't think it's "breaking the law" for an independent school to not offer science (hypothetically: clearly not the case here).


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 13, 2012 4:30 pm 
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daveg wrote:
Amber wrote:
http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Parents/Schoolslearninganddevelopment/ExamsTestsAndTheCurriculum/DG_10013877

Suppose it depends how you define the word 'statutory'. Perhaps I misunderstand it, but to me that means it's compulsory by statute,


It's compulsory for state schools to offer the NC. The school in question isn't a state school. Hence my question: I don't think it's "breaking the law" for an independent school to not offer science (hypothetically: clearly not the case here).

Ah, OK, fair point. Hadn't appreciated that it was an independent school. Interesting question. Guess it depends what the 'market' demands. :D


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