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PostPosted: Mon Jan 26, 2015 9:58 am 
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DS is considering taking Classics or Philosophy and Ethics as he has a keen interest in both.Older DC did not consider these topics so I have limited knowledge of them. I would appreciate advice /comments on pros and cons for both subjects please.DS is possible thinking about studying Law.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 26, 2015 11:13 am 
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I think either would be useful - using broad brush strokes, Classics is seen as equating with evidence of ability to study at an academic high level but will require a more structured learning approach (as there is still a high content of vocabulary learning in Classics) and P&E has a lot of "opinion" in it which is good for the debating skills. One may favour your DS's learning style more?


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 26, 2015 12:38 pm 
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And in a similar vein - where possible look at past papers/ mark schemes etc to guage how well one is able to prepare for the exam.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 26, 2015 1:04 pm 
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Both of these are excellent topics for Law, shame he can't do both. I would lean towards Philosophy and Ethics as it is a great grounding in how to evaluate arguments and discuss them. What boards are involved, ie AQA, OCR etc? DG


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 26, 2015 2:07 pm 
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Daogroupie wrote:
Both of these are excellent topics for Law


the odd thing is Maths and FM at A level are valued above both of these subjects for top Law Schools , at GCSEs anything goes? it make little difference.

Latin/Greek ( not Classic Civilisation -considered a soft option) would be expected over P&E if one's child is from a high performing Indie School, P&E is a little soft at GCSE and I would question such a choice :wink:


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 26, 2015 2:43 pm 
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If he's thinking of law it may be worth keeping his options open. My DS has expressed an interest so we discussed it with my sister-in-law, who's a lawyer. Her take on it was many successful lawyers now have an undergraduate degree in a non-law subject, then do a law conversion course. Her advise to my son was to take the subjects he enjoyed and would work hard in. Just one opinion though.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 26, 2015 3:05 pm 
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Agree with above comments.
I had assumed this was an extra choice, after more academic decisions had been made. As an extra for gaining broader knowledge / skills both are great but they wouldn't be ideal instead of the more traditional if a law degree is being considered ( history, mfl, Latin if available).

Demand & supply for new lawyers does fluctuate so having a non law first degree certainly keeps employment options open. Although a law degree doesn't of course confine one to a degree as a lawyer.

If a law degree is decided on then be wary of A level Law as many universities don't favour it where its one of three subjects - check the view of preferred institutions at that time.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 26, 2015 4:51 pm 
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I'd go with P&E over Classics but choose the one of most interest.

Look at the specifications on the exam board websites and any examples of assessment material.

www.aqa.org.uk
www.edexcel.org.uk
www.ocr.org.uk


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 28, 2015 4:37 pm 
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RedVelvet wrote:
If he's thinking of law it may be worth keeping his options open. My DS has expressed an interest so we discussed it with my sister-in-law, who's a lawyer. Her take on it was many successful lawyers now have an undergraduate degree in a non-law subject, then do a law conversion course. Her advise to my son was to take the subjects he enjoyed and would work hard in. Just one opinion though.


This is the main opinion I have heard, even from DS1's headmaster. Take any degree you are interested in and enjoy and do a one year conversion course.


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