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PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2011 9:17 am 
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Joined: Tue Apr 21, 2009 2:21 pm
Posts: 316
Hello,

I've looked at the Russell Group guide (and most of the other very helpful links at the top of the page,) but still struggling to come to a conclusion on whether DD will restrict her university options by taking combined Engl lit and language A level rather than the single English Lit. She doesn't know for sure yet what she would like to study at university (she is, after all, only 15!) but some sort of English lit/lang based course seems likely.

Without doubt, every university accepts English Lit as a strong A level, but the combined A level doesn't appear to have universal acceptance. For example, one of the unis state that the combined subject will be considered if the school doesn't offer the single subject.

Is it really a case of looking at all the entrance requirements for possible universities and checking whether they accept the combined subject? :shock: DD would prefer to do the combined as loves creative writing as well as the literature side of the subject, but I would hate to think that she is narrowing her options already :?

Any practical help from someone who has been there and done that would be extremely useful :D


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2011 10:45 am 
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Joined: Wed Sep 15, 2010 3:18 pm
Posts: 65
I think it unlikely, if her application is strong, that the combined Lit/Lang will rule her out of even an English degree. A recent applicant for English at Cambridge was asked why he chose the combined course as they favoured Literature A Level, but he was interviewed (and rejected - though they did not state that his choice of A level was the reason).

That said, if it is English she hopes to study, then she should do Literature. Creative writing opportunities are fairly easily found as extra curriculars and will look good on her personal statement. The combined course will not give her such a good grounding in literature and literary theory and if she wants to do a creative degree, she will still be better prepared through studying great writing first.

I find the combined course syllabus less interesting as a teacher, and have never taught in a department that offers it.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2011 11:22 am 
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Joined: Tue Apr 21, 2009 2:21 pm
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Thanks Phaedra, that's really helpful :D


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