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PostPosted: Wed Dec 07, 2011 9:30 pm 
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My daughter has just submitted her A Level choices for college and has now decided that she would like to study law. She has put down maths, English lit, art, textiles and photography. She thinks she will ditch photography now so that she can study law alongside her other subjects.

Has anyone had a son/daughter who has studied/is studying law and who could give us some information on it? Also, what A Levels should she be looking to study? I think we're probably on the right track with maths and English lit but any advice would be very welcome. :)


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 07, 2011 9:50 pm 
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Think they like Maths and english and then something like history geography or a language.


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 07, 2011 9:59 pm 
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Your DD doesn't need a law A 'Level to do a law degree. Nor will it give her advantage - possibly quite the opposite. In my experience she would do better with another traditional core subject such as those that HM has suggested or a science ( in my experience sciences are a very good grounding for the legal mindset).


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 07, 2011 10:38 pm 
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I agree Twinkle, a law 'A' level may actually be seen as a disadvantage at some unis. I think the joy of applying for law is that most academic subjects would be fine and can be either Arts or Sciences. Good luck to your DD! :D


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 07, 2011 10:48 pm 
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ourmaminhavana wrote:
I agree Twinkle, a law 'A' level may actually be seen as a disadvantage at some unis. I think the joy of applying for law is that most academic subjects would be fine and can be either Arts or Sciences. Good luck to your DD! :D


think the mixture of subjects people come in with can make the course more interesting. we had about 20 graduates studying medicine on our course - their varied backgrounds certainly added to the course


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 08, 2011 1:46 pm 
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Thanks for the replies. It sounds as though we don't need to think about studying law itself. I wonder if DD would be better shelving photography and doing geography instead? She is studying this at GCSE and is on track to get a very good grade. Or do we just go with the choices she has made on the grounds that some are 'hard' subjects and others are ones that she really enjoys? Anymore advice greatly received!


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 08, 2011 1:58 pm 
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If she really wants to do law then I think she would be best equipped with three hard academic subjects in addition to whatever else she wants to do. I think that she would be looked on much more favourably by the universities to which she applies and would better equip her for what is not an easy degree ( ie lots of academic study - at least it was in my day :D )


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 08, 2011 2:59 pm 
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Have a relative who has just started a Law degree. He did Maths, History and Economics A levels. English was his worst subject so he dropped it ASAP.

I have another acquaintance who actually did a History degree and is now doing a 2 year Law conversion course. The latter is highly regarded apparently (lawyer friend thinks moreso than a Law degree, possibly because it's what he did :D ) but of course it also ends up costing you twice as much.


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 08, 2011 3:08 pm 
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Quote:
I have another acquaintance who actually did a History degree and is now doing a 2 year Law conversion course


That’s the problem with History degrees, they don’t really serve any purpose… :lol:


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 08, 2011 3:17 pm 
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Rob Clark wrote:
Quote:
I have another acquaintance who actually did a History degree and is now doing a 2 year Law conversion course


That’s the problem with History degrees, they don’t really serve any purpose… :lol:

Not so Rob. You can become a History teacher.


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