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 Post subject: A level stress!
PostPosted: Fri Nov 14, 2014 11:32 am 
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Joined: Mon Apr 06, 2009 7:06 pm
Posts: 119
DC has just started VI Form, and is finding it very stressful, despite doing favourite subjects seems to be struggling to fit in all that is required. I have contacted the school (discretely) and have asked for the form tutor to keep an eye out. Have also insisted that weekend working at a shop must stop to allow relaxation time. What are others experiences? Any tips? Many thanks.


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 Post subject: Re: A level stress!
PostPosted: Fri Nov 14, 2014 11:47 am 
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Joined: Wed Nov 21, 2007 4:20 pm
Posts: 4660
DD started vith form in September.

Reports from her and all her friends is it's pretty full on.

DD has a job, she's cut out all extra shifts now (apart from during holiday time) and dies just her contracted hours, which are 6 a week. I think it's as important to keep thus apect up as it is to have free time. Her friends all work too. They are all also learning to drive but they still have time to socialise too.

There is a balance to be had, it's your dc who has to find it.

No tips unfortunately. These young adults have to take responsibility for themselves, with a bit of guidance now and then, but the initial moves need to come from them.

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 Post subject: Re: A level stress!
PostPosted: Fri Nov 14, 2014 1:15 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 1:21 pm
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A lot of students do find the 'step-up' a challenge as they are used to all their study time being organised for them.

What hours is he studying out of school? What feedback is he getting on his work?


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 Post subject: Re: A level stress!
PostPosted: Fri Nov 14, 2014 2:36 pm 
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Found that a relative of mine could do enormously more of everything - both work and leisure activities - in the upper sixth than the lower sixth. They're still growing, changing kids really. Sure you are doing the right thing and will adapt as things change.


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 Post subject: Re: A level stress!
PostPosted: Fri Nov 14, 2014 2:44 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 04, 2008 2:28 pm
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Many do find the jump to A level hard.

Try to have a sit down and talk through how they are organising their work and if there are particular subjects which are time consuming or difficult.

It is important to keep free time but also to make sure there isn't too much wasted time (on phone, laptop etc).

Everyone needs total downtime but constructive non-studying is probably more helpful for the majority of time - be that earning money, voluntary work, sport , music etc.

So much depends on the individual as to how much they can do beyond studying so comparing with others isn't always helpful.

They should have had marked assignments if not assessments by now so check with DC how these went.


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 Post subject: Re: A level stress!
PostPosted: Fri Nov 14, 2014 3:19 pm 
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Joined: Mon Apr 06, 2009 7:06 pm
Posts: 119
Thanks.
I think part of the problem is that school "study sessions" are filled with prefect duties, walking to the other school site, volunteering at the local primary school and language sessions with the Spanish support assistant!
Sport features heavily during the week, as well as driving lessons! (I had forgotten those!)Projected grades are good, the stress comes when homework is given in class and then further homework is emailed home.
I am grateful for all the replies, at least I know we are not on our own.


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 Post subject: Re: A level stress!
PostPosted: Fri Nov 14, 2014 3:31 pm 
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With all that going on during the week it's not hugely suprising that weekends are needed for studying.
Is there no sort of pattern to homework - its hard for them to be organised otherwise.

One of mine used to decide on a reasonable amount of time and then stop so as not to get over tired/ stressed ( eg 3 hours an evening , 6 hours on a Saturday....) but it depends on their personality as well.


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 Post subject: Re: A level stress!
PostPosted: Fri Nov 14, 2014 3:43 pm 
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We don't start them on prefect duties until later in the year and not in lesson time. Many schools don't allow driving lessons in school time either; of course the actual practical test is allowed.

How important is the work experience: does it need to be every week? How far is the other site? When I worked in a split site school, transport was organised so students did not have to walk.

I must say once I've set homework that's it; I don't set more by e-mail during the week. It's hard to be organised if work does not have a pattern.


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 Post subject: Re: A level stress!
PostPosted: Fri Nov 14, 2014 4:18 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 04, 2008 2:28 pm
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Ours didnt allow even tests in school time for a while ( don't know situation now) but maybe honscupboard was referring to all activities , not just in study periods. Eg ours have Tuesday afternoon set aside for sporting or volunteering etc. They don't have prefect duties until the end of year 12 though.

I find the emailing of homework willy nilly quite odd. Is it all members of staff or just one? I think this is something I'd try to get to the bottom of.


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 Post subject: Re: A level stress!
PostPosted: Fri Nov 14, 2014 4:29 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 12, 2007 12:42 pm
Posts: 3813
Location: Chelmsford and pleased
DD has 30mins of study period each week! The rest is taken up with lessons for four A levels and an hour for critical thinking. This means that she has little free time but a lot of education time. For me with another child who had a lot of 'free/study' time and much less education, I think it is good.
The downside is she is rarely available to push a hoover around the house! She still manages to fit in orchestra and subject related lunch activities. I think yrs 12 and 13 are hard work, possibly the toughest academically. It certainly was in the past. Over 10 yrs since I taught KS5 and even longer since I studied A levels!


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