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PostPosted: Tue Feb 23, 2010 8:52 pm 
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Joined: Tue Feb 23, 2010 8:41 pm
Posts: 3
Hi all.

I am an 11+ tutor in a UK learning centre which for the time being I shall not name. We run an 11+ preparation program on a weekly basis and I'm having a couple of issues with the way it works, but before I whinge to management I wanted to check it's not me who's the one with a problem.

Our weekly sessions are an hour long including a 5-10 minute warmup, during which we will cover two to three types of questions which might appear on an 11+ exam, e.g. number sequences, analogies etc. As you can imagine, less than twenty minutes per type is a **** of a squeeze and I really feel like I'm doing something of a disservice to my tutees by moving so quickly from sheet to sheet, particularly when a couple of them are finding it significantly harder than others. I always make sure to lead with an example, and once I'm satisfied the majority have some idea of how it works I'll let them get on with the worksheet and help them out on an as-needed basis. I encourage the group of 5 to help eachother (under close supervision of course), as I believe explaining things to others will reinforce their own knowledge of the work.

I just feel very much like I can't do my job properly with the time constraints dictated to me, and while I know a couple of my girls will likely do very well in this environment, I know a couple might not, and I was wondering if anyone had any pointers with regards to teaching methods or time management to make it better for everyone.

Thanks in advance for any advice you can provide.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 23, 2010 9:59 pm 
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Joined: Sat Nov 29, 2008 7:04 pm
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I think you've put your finger on the problem of group tutoring. Not all your tutees are going to work at the same rate, or grasp the material at the same time.

Being a tutor who fundamentally believes in one to one tuition, I think this is simply a cash maximisation exercise, not one that exists to benefit the children.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 23, 2010 10:09 pm 
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Joined: Tue Feb 23, 2010 8:41 pm
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ian35mm wrote:
I think you've put your finger on the problem of group tutoring. Not all your tutees are going to work at the same rate, or grasp the material at the same time.

Being a tutor who fundamentally believes in one to one tuition, I think this is simply a cash maximisation exercise, not one that exists to benefit the children.


It pains me to admit it, but I think you may be right to an extent, but then i'd rather be the one running a group than someone else with much less experience who would ultimately do an even worse job under the conditions set before them.

That said, there will hopefully be some movement of children between groups according to ability. I might try to persuade my employers to let me run a second hour a week, even without me getting paid for it, but I'm not holding my breath....


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 24, 2010 11:26 am 
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Joined: Tue Oct 16, 2007 9:28 am
Posts: 1123
Location: Bexley
Arterion, could you not set up on your own and do it your way?


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 24, 2010 11:32 am 
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Joined: Tue Feb 23, 2010 8:41 pm
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Not without likely being fired I wouldn't think, which I simply can't afford at the moment...


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 24, 2010 7:05 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 12, 2007 12:42 pm
Posts: 3818
Location: Chelmsford and pleased
I enjoy both group work and individual work, but treat them in different ways.

When introducing a new VR topic I like to spend most of a session on that topic, with plenty of examples and teaching the "tricks" to spot for the more difficult examples. Once children are happy with all 21 techniques I then like to use five or more techniques per session and check that they are using the appropriate time-saving technique for each type. At these early stages I do not time the children as I want them to master the techniques.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 24, 2010 7:26 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2008 2:36 pm
Posts: 459
Location: Rugby
It is a couple of years back now but I really spent a lot of money on tutoring to ensure my youngest dd had the maximum confidence building. I had taken her out of school and home schooled her because she was being ignored on account of already being 5's across the board in year five. The central benefit of all the tutoring was that she decided to take responsibility for her own destiny. Statistics over several years showed a marked general improvement during the summer vacation prior to the 11+ exam in each of the candidates who benefited from small group teaching. This was better than 10% and ultimately there was 100% success at the 11+ exam. My dd surpassed herself, not only passing the 11+ but gaining a scholarship to Rugby School. She was described by her tutor as an excellent student. Happily every school day is still embraced with the same enthusiasm. Of course, it goes without saying the tutor was an excellent tutor!


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