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 Post subject: Becoming a Tutor
PostPosted: Wed Dec 15, 2010 11:46 pm 
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Joined: Wed Dec 15, 2010 10:59 pm
Posts: 2
Hi all,

I have recently been considering becoming a private maths tutor at home in East Yorkshire. I have a degree in maths, but no real teaching experience, other than helping people out informally.

I was wondering if any teachers or tutors could offer me any advice for getting started. Do you think my lack of teaching experience will be a problem?

Also, if any parents are reading this, would you consider hiring someone without teaching experience as a private tutor for your child?

All feedback and comments appreciated!

Thanks

Andrew


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 Post subject: Re: Becoming a Tutor
PostPosted: Thu Dec 16, 2010 6:08 pm 
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Joined: Fri Dec 03, 2010 6:08 pm
Posts: 55
Hi ajhill,

I am replying from a parents point of view... I would most certainly consider hiring a
tutor without teaching experience. To me, there would be other factors such as how well you are able to teach, rapport with the child, your awareness of what my child should know at the age of tutoring.

Hope the above helps a little bit.


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 Post subject: Re: Becoming a Tutor
PostPosted: Thu Dec 16, 2010 6:09 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jun 18, 2007 2:32 pm
Posts: 6966
Location: East Kent
what age group were you thinking of tutoring?


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 Post subject: Re: Becoming a Tutor
PostPosted: Thu Dec 16, 2010 7:02 pm 
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Joined: Fri Sep 15, 2006 8:51 am
Posts: 8113
I think the age group you are planning to tutor is very important. I have only ever taught grown ups.... well medical students anyway. More a matter of passing on info and not necessarily sorting them out if they couldn't get it... just send 'em back to look in the books again, then they were supposed to be academically OK.

Doesn't mean to say that I could EVER teach a group of younger kids - just haven't a clue about the techniques you use to help them if they have a problem understanding things... Best Maths teacher I ever had (Mrs B, KEHS Birmingham) did not have a degree - she was just a blooming good teacher.

It is great if you can do this but how do you know at the mo that you can do it?


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 Post subject: Re: Becoming a Tutor
PostPosted: Thu Dec 16, 2010 7:08 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jun 02, 2009 9:28 pm
Posts: 2439
As a parent, I would be cautious about hiring a new tutor who hasn't had any experience with chidren or the 11+ exam. If they have sucessfully self-tutored their own child/ren, or had alot of experience with children, then I'd be happier. As a parent, you employ a tutor to 'guarantee' a sucessful outcome (I know nothing is guaranteed) so someone with no proven track record would be a risk.

Why don't you contact local tutors and shadow them to them to gain useful experience.

I hope the above isn't too negative, I'm just being realistic and honest.


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 Post subject: Re: Becoming a Tutor
PostPosted: Thu Dec 16, 2010 7:16 pm 
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Joined: Mon Oct 18, 2010 9:01 am
Posts: 155
I know someone who tutored his own 3 children in Maths for their GCSE and A levels, and having got them through it - with good grades - he now tutors. Like you, he does not have a teaching background but he went to Cambridge and has excellent qualifications.

He signed up on a tutors website and now has pupils from there. 8)


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 Post subject: Re: Becoming a Tutor
PostPosted: Thu Dec 16, 2010 7:36 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2006 7:10 pm
Posts: 8200
Location: Buckinghamshire
Hi Andrew

You might like to take a look at the guidance we give to parents on selecting a tutor:
http://www.elevenplusexams.co.uk/servic ... us-tutors/

Although that refers to 11+ tutors, the same would apply to maths or any other subject. Unless you were willing to visit pupils in their own homes I think a CRB check would be essential, unless you already have one through some other source.

As yoyo says, the age group is crucial. You have really got to enjoy teaching children of the age you select. If you can;'t stand grumpy teenagers, go for a lower age range. If you find 9 year olds annoying, go for GCSE pupils.

You must really research the curriculum thoroughly though, whichever age range you choose. Don't underestimate how much time you will need to spend on lesson planning either - I know just how much time a friend who is an NQT has to put into that.

I know of someone who started tutoring with no teaching experience but a relevant degree and she has made a success of it. It isn't impossible, but you need to do your research first.

Sally-Anne


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 Post subject: Re: Becoming a Tutor
PostPosted: Thu Dec 16, 2010 8:01 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jun 18, 2007 2:32 pm
Posts: 6966
Location: East Kent
I would also add that if you are going to teach the KS2 age group that you are familiar with the methods that are used in schools these days e.g. "chunking" for division and the grid method for multiplication.


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 Post subject: Re: Becoming a Tutor
PostPosted: Fri Dec 17, 2010 3:55 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 12, 2007 12:42 pm
Posts: 3813
Location: Chelmsford and pleased
I began "tutoring" with a university undergraduate (first-class honours) who had never passed an O level in maths. We had to begin with the three times table, but after 6 months she got an A. I wasn't paid and we paddled around together nearly every evening. It was a great insight into just how hard maths can be for the non-mathematical.

If you are looking at 11+ then you will need to research your area thoroughly and make sure that you have a good knowledge of the techniques.

As for GCSE and A level maths, your pupils will come expecting an encyclopaedic knowledge of the syllabus - do you remember all the boring circle theorems, etc. Some of the A* level questions are challenging and fun but beyond most pupils who require extra tuition.

My husband, with his theoretical physics degree, cannot help our daughter because he cannot understand why she cannot grasp such simple concepts. This is a common problem amongst mathematicians - great at maths; useless at teaching.


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 Post subject: Re: Becoming a Tutor
PostPosted: Fri Dec 17, 2010 10:52 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jun 18, 2007 2:32 pm
Posts: 6966
Location: East Kent
moved wrote:
My husband, with his theoretical physics degree, cannot help our daughter because he cannot understand why she cannot grasp such simple concepts. This is a common problem amongst mathematicians - great at maths; useless at teaching.

:lol:
when I went for my interview for my PGCE they said that, in general Science graduates had difficulty in descending to the level required for KS2, but in my case he had no worries..I would have no problem descending to that level...I am still not sure whether or not it was a compliment!


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