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PostPosted: Sat Sep 17, 2011 10:54 am 
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Location: Herts
Does anyone know if this is legal in primary state schools?


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 17, 2011 10:57 am 
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I would NEVER tutor one of my own students - it doesn't seem very moral to me.

Any help I give e.g. at lunchtime is free. :D


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 17, 2011 12:17 pm 
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Location: High Wycombe
Not sure about the legality, but it has been stated in writing at my school that teachers should not do this.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 17, 2011 1:06 pm 
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I don't see why it would be illegal, but, in some parts of the country, the headteacher/governors/LA would not approve.

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 17, 2011 2:33 pm 
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I do know of schools in counties where there are no grammars where teachers are sometimes employed privately to prepare children for entrance to Independant schools - it doesn't seem to happen in areas where State selective schools are available. No sure why.

I also know a couple of state primaries (again in counties without the 11+) where teachers offer catch up or booster tutoring to children who are seen to be underperforming. I think this is dreadful - if these children need extra help they should be getting it for free in class - not at £20 an hour outside school.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 17, 2011 6:24 pm 
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push-pull-mum wrote:
I do know of schools in counties where there are no grammars where teachers are sometimes employed privately to prepare children for entrance to Independant schools - it doesn't seem to happen in areas where State selective schools are available. No sure why.


I guess in the areas where there are state selectives, the offer for tutoring for admission exams + becomes specialised and more widely available?

push-pull-mum wrote:
I also know a couple of state primaries (again in counties without the 11+) where teachers offer catch up or booster tutoring to children who are seen to be underperforming. I think this is dreadful - if these children need extra help, they should be getting it for free in class - not at £20 an hour outside school.


I agree, I am surprised why this would not be illegal.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 17, 2011 6:27 pm 
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Etienne wrote:
I don't see why it would be illegal, but, in some parts of the country, the headteacher/governors/LA would not approve.


But I am talking about the situation where a teacher would teach his/her own student...

Why would this be beneficial, it seems to cause a perverse incentive?


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 17, 2011 6:54 pm 
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pabrighton0 wrote:
Etienne wrote:
I don't see why it would be illegal, but, in some parts of the country, the headteacher/governors/LA would not approve.


But I am talking about the situation where a teacher would teach his/her own student...

Why would this be beneficial, it seems to cause a perverse incentive?

Where I live (Essex) I have never seen it happen - but actually I would be all in favour. Our state primaries specifically do not prepare children for 11+ - and there is Maths on the test which isn't covered in lessons by November Year 6, even if you do accept the schools' argument that tutoring for Verbal Reasoning is largely unnecessary [insert extremely rude emoticon indicating disbelief here].
I would be quite happy to employ one of the Key Stage 2 teachers who know my child, and their strengths, weaknesses, and personality to tutor them in the run up to the exam and think that they would probably do a better job than a stranger.

I can, however, understand why schools wouldn't like it - and would probably prefer, for example, the previous year's teacher, to a current teacher in case there were any feelings of favouritism among their classmates.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 17, 2011 7:33 pm 
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pabrighton0 wrote:
I agree, I am surprised why this would not be illegal.
Which particular Act of Parliament would make it unlawful, I wonder? I can't immediately think of one.

On the other hand, I suspect most selective authorities do not approve of extra tutoring for the 11+. In this situation, there might be a local policy that teachers employed by the authority should not tutor for the 11+.

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 17, 2011 8:31 pm 
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push-pull-mum wrote:
Where I live (Essex) I have never seen it happen - but actually I would be all in favour. Our state primaries specifically do not prepare children for 11+ - and there is Maths on the test which isn't covered in lessons by November Year 6, even if you do accept the schools' argument that tutoring for Verbal Reasoning is largely unnecessary [insert extremely rude emoticon indicating disbelief here].
I would be quite happy to employ one of the Key Stage 2 teachers who know my child, and their strengths, weaknesses, and personality to tutor them in the run up to the exam and think that they would probably do a better job than a stranger.

I can, however, understand why schools wouldn't like it - and would probably prefer, for example, the previous year's teacher, to a current teacher in case there were any feelings of favouritism among their classmates.


I am sure it would be beneficial for the specific student (and that many teachers would be the ideal tutors) but is it beneficial for the 11+ admission system as a whole?

The incentive to deliver the best teaching at school would reduce. In fact, in many cases, the teaching for special needs seems to fall in a similar trap of perpetuating the issues..

Favouritism is a good word (but could be called many other things).

The idea that VR tutoring is unnecessary is laughable and that anyone that tries to defend it may be very idealistic (regarding equal opportunities, etc). Obviously not empowering and unhelpful.


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