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PostPosted: Tue Sep 20, 2011 2:41 pm 
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Joined: Fri Feb 18, 2011 1:45 pm
Posts: 48
Hi all,
Looked at this thread..
http://www.elevenplusexams.co.uk/forum/11plus/viewtopic.php?f=19&t=19376&view=previous

Has useful info, but, I suppose its for children in Year 5. When they are in Year 4, when they would be introduced to methods and techniques, what kind of tutoring should I expect?? Should the tutors still have a specific plan?? Especially when they have to cover different subjects - maths, vr, nvr, etc. Is it alright to ask them what's the plan for this month/term??

And wrt homework, generally do the tutors set homework for each day(say 6 homeworks in a week with one day attending the tutor)?? Or is it 'a' homework to done over the week? And, if the child goes for 2- 3 subjects how will the home work span over a week?


Thanks a lot..


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:23 pm 
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Joined: Sat May 30, 2009 12:06 pm
Posts: 2095
Location: Birmingham
A good tutor (IMO!) will either not tutor in Year 4 :wink: or spend Year 4 building a good relationship with the child, ensuring very solid building blocks are in place for further work in Year 5, and will not panic by overburdening children with sacks of repetitive homework.

I have learned (the hard way) that the most efficient way to revise for the 11 plus is to go slowly, steadily, then have an intense period of work in the last 6-8 months. That way you can keep the child on board, bring out the heavy work when they're motivated and mature enough to handle it, and prevent burn-out.

I have seen children in Year 3 and 4 with 1 or 2 inch thick stacks of weekly homework from tutors. Interestingly, these tend to be the children who don't make it successfully. By the time it really matters, they have had enough.

I know that the stakes are so high that parents (incl. me) can feel panicky about 'wasting precious time' and not doing as much as the Joneses.
But I now strongly believe that ultimately, a child 'needs to be let be a child' in Yr 4. Year 5, and its pressures, will come quickly enough. The very best tuition is to enjoy poetry and good books together, play educational games, help them enjoy learning for the sake of learning, and, yes, lay down a few good literacy and maths foundations, but only with the child, never to them.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 02, 2011 7:18 am 
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Joined: Mon Jun 18, 2007 2:32 pm
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Location: East Kent
I think ,personally, year 4 is too early, but would spend that time improving basic maths, mastering recall of tables and improving vocabulary.


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2011 1:13 pm 
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Joined: Thu Apr 03, 2008 12:40 pm
Posts: 298
If I were to consider a tutor for a child in year 4 I would look for someone who does general schoolwork and perhaps things they find difficult at school rather than specific 11+ prep.

I have a DD in year 3. We are playing maths games, there are some very good free ones online. When she is bored we snuggle up on the sofa and get the laptop out. We also learn our tables and play mental maths games in the car or whilst we are chopping vegetables/ cooking meals, etc. We also make time to read together and discuss any words she doesn't know. Altough she doesn't realize this is in fact our early 11+ prep. I think we will keep this going until at least the 2nd half of year 4.

This was about the same time when we started to revise the 11+ syllabus and introduce the easy bond books for VR & NVR but no more than 1 page a day. Again this was usually done whilst cooking/chopping something and it wasn't done in a sit down way and find the answer way. We looked at the questions and discussed how we would get to the answers. It was only when she went back to school after the Christmas break in year 5 when we started revising in more detail and by Easter the pressure was really on. This may sound late, but still it was very hard going, because by the time we got to the test she was bored with it all. Had I started earlier, I don't think I could have kept her going.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 19, 2011 10:17 pm 
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Joined: Fri Nov 07, 2008 12:07 pm
Posts: 217
Location: Kingston
I would expect vocabulary work, boosting mental maths speed and gentle introductions to VR and NVR if they are relevant to the 11+ in your area.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 20, 2011 12:45 pm 
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Joined: Sun Sep 11, 2011 4:55 pm
Posts: 27
We had a tutor for DS in Year 4, but not for VR.
She covered basic school work. We felt that we wanted to make sure he had solid maths and literacy skills, so that if he did pass 11+, he could cope at Grammar School.
We started working through the Bond Verbal Reasoning books for 7-8 years old and 8-9 years old, at home. We called them his quiz! He did one section per week and loved it. It gave him an introduction to the VR techniques, without putting any pressure on.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 26, 2011 6:13 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jan 13, 2008 6:18 pm
Posts: 238
Location: Gloucestershire
yoyo123 wrote:
I think ,personally, year 4 is too early, but would spend that time improving basic maths, mastering recall of tables and improving vocabulary.


This advice is spot on. Beware any tutors who say a child needs more than 12 months VR tuition. :roll:


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