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PostPosted: Thu Apr 19, 2012 8:03 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 21, 2011 2:49 pm
Posts: 261
I'm reallly shocked to find someone advertising themselves as a tutor up to and including GCSE in my area-ish on Facebook who hasn't studied past GCSE themselves! :shock:

time for tea


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 19, 2012 8:16 pm 
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Joined: Fri Sep 15, 2006 8:51 am
Posts: 8113
Caveat Emptor!

good job I gave up latin at O level :lol: :lol:

Glad you've put the kettle on...


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 21, 2012 11:24 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jan 13, 2008 6:18 pm
Posts: 238
Location: Gloucestershire
Proof indeed that people need to carry out thorough checks before hiring a tutor!


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 22, 2012 8:59 am 
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Joined: Thu Sep 24, 2009 10:59 am
Posts: 5922
Far more shocking to me is that staff working in nurseries and other early years settings need have no qualifications at all. There is guidance that half of staff in a nursery need to have a BTEC level 2 or equivalent. This takes 8 months to study for and many courses require nothing in the way of qualifications for entrants, though some courses may ask for 3 GCSEs. So there we are, with an Early Years Foundation Stage consisting of at present 69 learning goals (uniquely in the world, it seems, we have learning goals for babies from birth :shock: ) and we do not require any qualifications of the staff who are supposed to 'teach' these (imho wholly inappropriate, but nonetheless statutory) things to our littlest children.

So a tutor with some GCSEs starts to look positively overqualified.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 22, 2012 9:06 am 
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Joined: Mon Oct 10, 2011 6:00 pm
Posts: 406
I worked as a Nanny for 2 years.
I was amazed at the range of people these very rich parents had employed to look after and in many cases, bring up, their most valuable items (the DCs).


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 22, 2012 9:07 am 
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Joined: Mon Jun 18, 2007 2:32 pm
Posts: 6966
Location: East Kent
I agree Amber, I am new to eyfs being KS2 trained.

The mind boggling chart of things I am supposed to look for, assess, record and take pictures of, 30 times over, fried my brain!


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 22, 2012 9:10 am 
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Joined: Thu Sep 24, 2009 10:59 am
Posts: 5922
There is a saying, 'hair or care' - a bit cruel, but designed to show that less academic students, especially girls, should either become hairdressers or look after small children. In contrast with many countries (in Finland, much quoted, you need a Masters level qualification to work with young children) we don't seem to put much value on the Early Years, and then we are all wringing our hands about the lack of social and academic prowess of our young people. Sorry, OT I suppose, but the qualifications of those entrusted with educating are a bit of a hot topic atm, and especially for me as I am writing an assignment on it!


yoyo - cross posted. Rest assured that after yet another review, it will be down to a mere 17 'outcomes'. Until the next review....
Close friend is an assessor of Early Years professionals. She says they spend more time writing down what children can do than actually interacting with them. An inevitable consequence of our measurement culture. :( If it moves, measure it.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 22, 2012 9:15 am 
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Joined: Tue Oct 27, 2009 8:19 pm
Posts: 6255
The EYFS is changing again from September, just been on a course about it.

Amber, what you have to consider is that the levels of pay in Early Years are truly awful, I am not defending the low qualification levels of entrants, but until practitioners get paid more it will remain so. As a graduate with an additional professional qualification and EY qualifications on top, plus all the courses I have to go on too, I get paid less per hour than most cleaners etc. (by the way I am not knocking cleaners just a comparison against an occupation which requires no quals as far as I know - I don't earn enough to have a cleaner :lol: ). There is also very little local council or government funding around for people to undertake courses and qualifications once they are working.

(rant over, sorry but it's something I feel very very passionately about)


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 22, 2012 9:19 am 
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Joined: Mon Jun 18, 2007 2:32 pm
Posts: 6966
Location: East Kent
Quote:
She says they spend more time writing down what children can do than actually interacting with them.


Oh so true...I sit on the edge of the sandpit , franticallyscribbling away while trying to balance all the appetising "food" that I am being plied with from the play kitchen and "ice cream shop", attempting , to listen, capture and tick interesting snippets.

I am almost glad to see year 6 after that!


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 22, 2012 9:23 am 
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Joined: Tue Oct 27, 2009 8:19 pm
Posts: 6255
And all that planning, preparation and writing up has to be done at home free of charge! I say this through gritted teeth knowing that I have a whole day of such work ahead of me today!


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