Go to navigation
It is currently Tue Dec 06, 2016 8:18 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 22 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2007 5:22 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri May 18, 2007 10:39 am
Posts: 8
I was chatting to a friend who works in a grammar school (to the east of me here in Surrey) about tutoring.

He said that the head of the school was getting very worried about the levels of tutoring. They had had several cases last year where the child had been tutored for the 11+ exam, passed, but then when they got the reports & documentation from the primary schools, these children were expected to get level 4's and even 3's in their Y6 SATS - where most children are expected to get 3 level 5's.

Then, surprise surprise, said children severely struggled to keep up at maths, english, science... But are now very good at the 11+ exam, as that's what they've been tutored for.

Is this fair on the children - both those struggling and those having to put up with them in the class?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2007 7:14 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jan 12, 2006 3:29 pm
Posts: 625
Hi Surreydad

I tend to see the problem as not being inappropriate children, but inappropriate or inadequate tests. It is easy for the headteacher to focus on the individual child and be negative rather than seek to change the system.

If children who are not suitable for grammar school are passing 11+ tests then the LEA should be looking more carefully at the structure of the test.

The best the LEA can do is ask the test provider to vary the format and content of the tests on a year to year basis. This is easy to do for verbal reasoning because of the number of question types that are not used for the tests and should not be difficult in any of the other areas.

In some counties the format and question type content are known a number of years in advance, making it easy for tutors to teach kids to jump through hoops.

Regards

Mike


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jul 25, 2007 9:36 pm 
..which is why even parents of bright kids are paying for tutors - fear of a few children unsuited to grammar school getting in by dint of mega-tutoring for the test and possibly taking places from children more suited.
Just keeps the vicious circle turning!


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 07, 2007 1:16 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Nov 02, 2006 3:07 pm
Posts: 1149
Location: Finchley - Barnet
Grumpy etc... wrote:
..which is why even parents of bright kids are paying for tutors - fear of a few children unsuited to grammar school getting in by dint of mega-tutoring for the test and possibly taking places from children more suited.
Just keeps the vicious circle turning!


Perhaps parents of unsuitable children think that their children are suitable and hence tutor them or parents of suitable children think that their children are unsuitable and hence tutor them. Or both... (hi,hi :lol: )

In any case good news for tutors!

_________________
sj355


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2007 7:34 pm 
let's face it - it is an abrbitary age to test anyone - some children may be ready others not - tutoring just makes the picture more complicated.
The people complaining about over-boosting are just feeling a bit nervous - the stats show that children who just make it to a grammar school are pulled up their peers and horror of horrors others who don't are dragged down by theirs. Some parents would be much happier with the element of chance removed - too much on the day factor - and would rather fall back on catchment, sibling entry policies if the school was good enough - might be too good and popular is the problem - all those children where education is everything and not too many liberal distractions.
Pay the Tutor, cross your fingers, and hope for the best , be terrible to miss out on one tutor inspired mark, personally I think a good breakfast and a restful nights sleep is just as important on the big day.


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2007 8:23 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jun 18, 2007 2:32 pm
Posts: 6966
Location: East Kent
I'm a tutor, if i think a child has little chance, tehn I would tellthe parent.

I look on tutoring as being like coaching for a child who can run fast , or catch a ball well..just famniliarising them and honing theor technique so that they can acheive their potential


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2007 8:41 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Dec 04, 2005 3:47 pm
Posts: 1348
Location: Berks,Bucks
yoyo123 wrote:
I look on tutoring as being like coaching for a child who can run fast , or catch a ball well..just famniliarising them and honing theor technique so that they can acheive their potential


I like the comparison, Yoyo :D

As for boosting inappropriate children, it is inevitable that some parents will make mistakes, like for any other area of life.
Parents can also find it be difficult to know their child ability because many primary school won't tell more than 'your child is doing well' to anyone who is not struggling!
In addition, there is some research from the NFER that says that grammar schools benefit the most to borderline children. Kids just above the line will benefit, but those just below may struggle. It may be quite difficult for some parents to know what to do, and not all of them have good tutors able to advise wisely.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2007 9:29 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jun 18, 2007 2:32 pm
Posts: 6966
Location: East Kent
:oops:

I think I need a typing tutor


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Sep 30, 2007 5:50 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jan 11, 2007 10:30 pm
Posts: 960
Oh good, another chance for me to mount my hobbyhorse and gallop round the playground!

The whole point of the 11+ used to be that it gave an opportunity to all - but particularly to bright children from 'less advantaged' backgrounds-to access the best education available. It just doesn't do that any more. It's now just another system that the educated middleclasses can manipulate to their advantage. Any I know people are going to say - "I came from a disadvantaged background and my child passed" , remember that anybody who has access to a computer, knows how to use it, knows how to get to this site and use it - and actually knows how to write and post coherent contributions on this forum is in a significantly more 'advantaged" position that a lot of parents in the country.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Sep 30, 2007 7:29 am 
So Katel

What is the solution??????????????????


Top
  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 22 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
CALL 020 8204 5060
   
Privacy Policy | Refund Policy | Disclaimer | Copyright © 2004 – 2016