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PostPosted: Tue Mar 05, 2013 4:20 pm 
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Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2012 4:51 pm
Posts: 18
I’m thinking of entering my DS for CRGS or QEB. I am not keen on using agencies or Eleven-plus factories. There’s no shortage of freelance tutors, but so far, the ones I have found are a bit on the average side. I’m not worried about rates for someone who fits the following bill:

1. They have a PGCE or an educational degree.
2. They have a degree (with at least a 2.1) in a subject which requires good mathematical and language ability. I wish to avoid tutors with “soft” degrees, or those with no more than a 2.2 in the better-rated degrees.
3. It would be a plus if they had strong A levels and got into a Grammar school themselves.

Please PM me if anyone comes to mind in N. London/S. Herts/W. Essex.

Thanks.

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 05, 2013 6:25 pm 
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Joined: Sat Feb 13, 2010 11:02 pm
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Pushy_Parent wrote:
I’m not worried about rates for someone who fits the following bill:

1. They have a PGCE or an educational degree.
2. They have a degree (with at least a 2.1) in a subject which requires good mathematical and language ability. I wish to avoid tutors with “soft” degrees, or those with no more than a 2.2 in the better-rated degrees.
3. It would be a plus if they had strong A levels and got into a Grammar school themselves.


Be careful what you ask for:

1. I don't have a PGCE.
2. I didn't get a 2:1
3. I didn't go to a grammar school

But I managed to DIY 2 children to super-selectives.

The point I am trying to make is that it doesn't matter what they are like on paper. It is how they interact and motivate your son that matters.

(and is your son capable of passing the exam for a super selective? -it is not always the tutor's fault)


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 06, 2013 11:23 am 
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Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2012 4:51 pm
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999 mum said: The point I am trying to make is that it doesn't matter what they are like on paper. It is how they interact and motivate your son that matters.

To 999 mum: Thanks for the tip, but what a tutor is like on paper does matter. A PGCE does give non-DIY parents reasonable security that a graduate has the ability to teach (of which ability to interact and motivate that you mention, are just two of many elements). A good general education and degree, also gives non-DIY parents reasonable security that the graduate’s English and/or Maths skills are good. Most state schools will expect a PGCE (or similar) of a teacher. The only reason they don’t expect a 2.1 degree, is that there would be insufficient teachers.

I cannot DIY as I have a full-time job and little free time. I will have to pay someone to get favourable results for my DS the first time (there are no second chances at 11+). I also don’t have the time to interview more than 2 or 3 tutors. Therefore, a tutor’s qualifications are the best starting point for me.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 06, 2013 1:39 pm 
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Joined: Wed Sep 05, 2012 6:08 pm
Posts: 373
There are no guarantees here. No tutor can get your child into a super selective; all a tutor can do is work on improving the skills of your DS and helping him to acquire new ones. His confidence will be boosted because he will feel more able to tackle the questions on the paper. Speed too will improve and so will accuracy.

Other DC will be preparing the same way or they will be naturally gifted with an incredibly high IQ and not need tutoring at all yet still sail through. These are the students your DC is up against.

Most teachers I know, and I know hundreds, do not tutor because of tax reasons.

Good luck finding someone who fits all your criteria. Hope DS does well next year.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 07, 2013 7:53 am 
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Joined: Sat Jul 21, 2012 5:55 pm
Posts: 364
Hi Pushy_Parent!

Your criteria are those for a secondary school teacher, possibly an A Level teacher. I note that you did not list 'love of subject' or 'likes kids' or 'enjoys working with kids' or 'empathy'. The skills, instincts and personality needed to teach/coach a kid aged 9 or 10 are quite different from what your list demands.

I would not focus on my demands as a parent, rather the needs of my child. .... I wholeheartedly echo the sentiments of the previous posters.

Incidentally, I have worked in schools and still work with schools. I know lots of teachers with good Bachelors degrees and quite a few with Masters degrees and PhDs. I have found no correlation between paper qualifications and teaching competence. Also, 11 plus coaching is very, very different from classroom teaching in a school. Some of us have done both.

Good luck to you and your son. But please be careful what you wish for.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 07, 2013 8:31 am 
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Joined: Fri Sep 15, 2006 8:51 am
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Suspect the tutors to look far are the ones who have got booked up by word of mouth and don't need to be interviewed by parents!! :wink:


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 07, 2013 9:17 am 
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Joined: Tue Oct 27, 2009 8:19 pm
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More importantly, in my humble opinion, is whether your dc and the tutor are going to get along with each other. No child is going to learn on a one-to-one basis with an adult they don't like - very different to not liking a teacher at school when you are in a class of 20 or 30 others!


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 07, 2013 10:44 am 
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Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2012 4:51 pm
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Kingfisher wrote:
There are no guarantees here. No tutor can get your child into a super selective; all a tutor can do is work on improving the skills of your DS and helping him to acquire new ones. His confidence will be boosted because he will feel more able to tackle the questions on the paper. Speed too will improve and so will accuracy.


Thanks for your input. Of course, there are no guarantees, but parents need to minimise risks of a poor choice of tutor.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 07, 2013 10:51 am 
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Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2012 4:51 pm
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Kingfisher wrote:
Most teachers I know, and I know hundreds, do not tutor because of tax reasons.


Pls do PM me if anyone good comes to mind.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 07, 2013 11:10 am 
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Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2012 4:51 pm
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Jean.Brodie wrote:
Hi Pushy_Parent!

Your criteria are those for a secondary school teacher, possibly an A Level teacher. I note that you did not list 'love of subject' or 'likes kids' or 'enjoys working with kids' or 'empathy'. The skills, instincts and personality needed to teach/coach a kid aged 9 or 10 are quite different from what your list demands.

I would not focus on my demands as a parent, rather the needs of my child. .... I wholeheartedly echo the sentiments of the previous posters.

Incidentally, I have worked in schools and still work with schools. I know lots of teachers with good Bachelors degrees and quite a few with Masters degrees and PhDs. I have found no correlation between paper qualifications and teaching competence. Also, 11 plus coaching is very, very different from classroom teaching in a school. Some of us have done both.

Good luck to you and your son. But please be careful what you wish for.


Thanks for your input.
Re: Criteria - possibly high, but I have been shocked by the language/numeracy skills of some graduate tutors out there. No harm in attracting the best for your money.
Re: Personal skills of tutor - of course these are important, but can be established (interview & trial) after a tutor meets your primary specs
Re: Needs of the child - indeed, a child needs both in a tutor, a good education and other teaching-related skills
Re: High academic qualifications - point taken, a tutor's quals do not guarantee teaching ability, but they help in getting half way to a good choice of tutor

Do PM me if a good one comes to mind.


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