Latest Educational News

We blight children’s lives for the sake of five good GCSEs

by Guardian, August 27, 2016

As misleading cliches go, those celebratory GCSE results-day photographs have to be right up there. For a lot of children – and a lot of parents – tableaux of happy, smiling teenagers, hugging each other in delight, are the final insult. These are yearly examples of the 16-year-old gold standard, the kind of child you must aspire to bring up. If your 16-year-old doesn’t fit in that picture, or had to be dragged into it, subjugated, resentful, kicking and screaming, then you, the parent, didn’t even scrape a C, let alone an A*.

Private schools A-level dip reflects national trends

by BBC, August 27, 2016

Classified as General.

Private schools saw a dip in top A-level results this year, largely reflecting national trends, figures released by the sector suggest.
The proportion of private school A-level entries gaining grade A or better was 48.7%, down from 49.3% last year, says the Independent Schools Council.
This is still almost twice the national average of 25.8%, itself down slightly from 25.9% in 2015, says the ISC.
Council chairman Barnaby Lenon called the figures encouraging.

Labour leadership: Smith pledges to scrap tuition fees

by BBC, August 27, 2016

Classified as General.

Labour leadership hopeful Owen Smith has set out plans to scrap university tuition fees in an effort to win over the youth vote.
Mr Smith has called for the current funding system to be abolished and replaced with a 1%-2% graduate tax.
He also promised a high-level apprenticeship to every 18-year-old who gets the grades.
Mr Smith is attempting to unseat Jeremy Corbyn less than a year after he was overwhelmingly elected leader.

GCSE results: 'My worry is for those who have failed to reach basic benchmarks in English and maths'

by TES, August 27, 2016

A good pass in the core subjects is treated by employers as the bare minimum for even the most junior positions. So how do we help those students who have failed in their second attempt to make the grade, asks the chief executive of the Sutton Trust
Make no mistake: unveiling your GCSE results is a life-defining moment.

Much has been said about the declining importance of GCSEs now that the education leaving age has been extended to 18. Yet in many ways they have become even more critical for young people’s prospects.

Whatever the future holds for our school exams, the core subjects of English and maths will always matter most.

Fall in private school A-level entries receiving top grades

by TES, August 27, 2016

Independent schools record a dip in the proportion of entries receiving top A* and A grades, as BTEC entries rise
Almost half of all independent school A-level entries received either an A* or an A in 2016, new figures from the Independent Schools Council (ISC) reveal.

A total of 48.7 per cent of exam entries from schools surveyed by the organisation were awarded the top two grades, which is nearly double the national average figure of 25.8 per cent.

However, the figures were down on last year, when 49.4 per cent of private school entries were awarded the top two grades.

How parents can reduce the cost of school uniforms

by Guardian, August 27, 2016

The expense of kitting out children can vary depending on their school, but clothing swaps on social media sites and council grants can help

New research from American Express shows heading back to school will cost the average family with two children £332 – the equivalent of nearly six weeks’ worth of food shopping – just to get the prescribed items from their uniform lists. Another survey found that British parents spend a whopping £4,000 on school uniforms throughout their child’s education.

More middle class families choosing state schools over the private sector as grades improve

by Telegraph, August 27, 2016

Classified as General.

Academies are driving up educational standards, campaigners have said, as the latest A-level figures show the gap between pupils gaining the highest grade at state and private schools is at its narrowest yet.

When the A* grade was introduced in 2010 there were 203 academies compared with nearly 4,000 now.

In that time the proportion of privately-educated pupils gaining a top grade has gone down significantly. Private schools have been hit disproportionately by efforts to cap grade inflation.

A-level results 2016: Independent schools results table

by Telegraph, August 27, 2016

Classified as General.

Use our first searchable A-level results table below to find out the A-level results from 291 independent schools across the country, including the percentage of subject entries graded A*/A or equivalent.

The second table shows the results of 41 independent schools with fewer than 25 candidates.

The Telegraph independent school league tables are created using data supplied by the Independent Schools Council (ISC). About 50 schools declined to submit results, which means that not every school is listed.

GCSE results 2016: The 100 best-performing state schools

by Independent, August 27, 2016

Classified as General.

Initial rankings of state selective and comprehensive schools by GCSE results show The Henrietta Barnett School and Thomas Telford come out top

As thousands of students across the country receive their GCSE results this week, secondary school heads will also be celebrating or commiserating how well their school reflects in terms of grades.

Private schools A-level dip reflects national trends

by BBC, August 27, 2016

Classified as General.

Private schools saw a dip in top A-level results this year, largely reflecting national trends, figures released by the sector suggest.
The proportion of private school A-level entries gaining grade A or better was 48.7%, down from 49.3% last year, says the Independent Schools Council.
This is still almost twice the national average of 25.8%, itself down slightly from 25.9% in 2015, says the ISC.
Council chairman Barnaby Lenon called the figures encouraging.

Who is top class? Television show puts teachers to the test

by TES Connect, August 26, 2016

They are very good at dispensing advice about revision and managing stress. But how do teachers cope when they themselves are put to the test? A new television series finds out
It is widely acknowledged that high-stakes testing is often just as stressful for teachers as it is for pupils.

But a new CBBC TV series is making this link explicit. In order for pupils to win the series Top Class, their teachers have to prove their own ability under test conditions.

Lights, camera, addition

Demonstrating that not all pupils believe they are already over-tested, children from 16 schools have voluntarily signed up for additional testing, as part of the 15-episode series.

Under the bright lights of the studio, host Susan Calman delivers what is essentially a made-for-cameras version of the key stage 2 tests.

“What’s 3,927 plus 432?” she asks. And, because no primary-school test would be complete without questions on grammar, pupils are asked to identify the parts of speech in a number of sentences, most of which would be unlikely ever to appear in the KS2 tests.

“In the sentence ‘Kim Kardashian wore a glittery dress to the awards’, which word is the adjective?” Calman asks. The pupils ace this round.

'The GCSE results illustrate how ministers have no choice but accept more flexibility in the EBacc'

by TES, August 26, 2016

The GCSE results show that students have varied needs and education policy must match the reality of this complex picture, says educational expert
Our warmest congratulations to the young people who have received their GCSE results yesterday and well done on your hard work.

Congratulations to the schools and teachers who have once again done such a fantastic job in preparing their pupils for these important examinations.

Today’s results come against a national backdrop of a decline in overall UK outcomes with the A*-C rate down by 2.1 percentage points, including a drop of 1.3 percentage points for 16 year olds.

'Why it's finally time to accept we need just one exam board'

by TES, August 26, 2016

The current situation is almost Kafkaesque, with ministers demanding schools improve year-on-year but the exam regulator making it impossible to do so, writes one education journalist
I know a columnist should never start off with words like this but I am not sure what we can deduce from this year's A-level results.

OK, the pass rate stays the same at 98.1 per cent and the number of A* and A grade passes went down slightly, from 25.9 per cent to 25.8 per cent.

Welcome to the world of "comparative outcomes", where exams regulator Ofqual decrees that this year's exam results should remain the same as the previous year's.

GCSE and A-level results: Female school-leavers urged to consider benefits of apprenticeships

by Independent, August 26, 2016

Classified as General.

Call comes at the same time report reveals the amount apprentices earn over the course of their lives is outstripping that of university graduates by up to 270%

Female school-leavers are being urged to consider the benefits of an apprenticeship as one million students take in the results of their A-levels and GCSEs this month.

Parents face charges for 'free' childcare, nurseries warn

by BBC, August 26, 2016

Classified as General.

Parents in England who claim extra free childcare from September will be asked to pay charges to help tackle a funding shortfall, nurseries have warned.
A government scheme offering 30 hours of childcare a week to working parents of three and four-year-olds is to be piloted in York next month.
But the Pre-school Learning Alliance said providers may refuse to offer the care because it could cost them money.

Councils 'should monitor academy cash'

by BBC, August 26, 2016

Classified as General.

Academy budgets should be overseen by local authorities following a series of financial abuses, say council leaders.
Cash earmarked for education in England is too often "disappearing into the back pockets of those in charge", says the Local Government Association.
Current scrutiny is ineffective, leaving the media and whistleblowers to uncover fraud, argues the LGA.
The government says academies and free schools are subject to greater scrutiny than council-run schools.

Parents 'struggle' to find holiday care for learning disabled children

by BBC News, August 25, 2016

Parents of children with learning disabilities are being pushed "to breaking point" by a lack of support during the holidays, Mencap says.
The charity said access to childcare in the summer break was "insufficient" and "inflexible" in many council areas.
In a survey of 316 parents, 56% told Mencap they struggled to access short breaks and respite services.
The Department for Education said it was doing "more than ever" to support families with childcare.
Almost half of the parents surveyed also said they found it difficult to access daily childcare during the summer months.

Teenagers 'need better advice for A-level choices'

by BBC News, August 25, 2016

Over half of this year's university applicants picked their sixth form subjects without considering their future prospects, suggests a poll.
And almost one in five of over 1,000 UK 18- and 19-year-olds polled for Which? said different subjects might have been better for their chosen degree course.
The consumer group says teenagers need better guidance on subject choice.
"It is a complex and difficult decision for young people," said head teachers' leader Malcolm Trobe.
The poll of 1,020 teenagers who applied to university this year also revealed that:
30% felt adequately informed about how their subject options would affect their university and degree choices
and 29% would have appreciated more advice on which subjects to take.
"Make sure you do your homework and choose wisely," Alex Neill of Which? University advised students.

GCSE results show significant decline

by BBC News, August 25, 2016

This year's GCSE results for England, Wales and Northern Ireland have shown a significant fall.
The proportion of pupils achieving A* to C has declined by 2.1% points to 66.9%. Top A* grades have slipped by 0.1% points to 6.5%.
This has been blamed on more pupils in England re-taking English and maths.
Michael Turner of the Joint Council for Qualifications, said there had been "significant movement in this year's entries, which impacts on results".
The results of more than five million GCSE entries are being revealed on Thursday.
This year's figures show a fall in both the overall pass rate and the proportion of top A* and A grades.
This has been attributed to a government plan in England to encourage more pupils to get A* -C grade GCSEs in maths and English, which required re-sits for tens of thousands who missed these grades last year.

What next after GCSEs? A guide to apprenticeships, BTECs and NVQs

by The Telegraph, August 24, 2016

GCSE Results Day has arrived. On August 25, thousands of students across the country, will be considering their options for the future.

Although A-levels remain the traditional route taken for post-16 education, there are several alternatives that students can consider. Here is our guide to apprenticeships, BTECs, NVQs, and traineeships.

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