Latest Educational News

UK firms must learn to do without imported labour, warns Ofsted boss

by Guardian, July 21, 2016

Brexit is a chance for radical change in vocational training to meet needs of business, says schools inspectorate chief
British companies will need to start relying more on local workers rather than labour from eastern Europe, according to the chief inspector of schools, Michael Wilshaw.

Wilshaw said he would be urging politicians to seize “the opportunity that now suddenly presents itself to reorder our technical and vocational education system in a truly radical way” after last month’s EU referendum result.

Children who know what course they want to study by age of 10 more likely to get into top universities

by Independent, July 21, 2016

Classified as General.

A UCAS survey of 16,600 students found that those with a clear idea of their ambitions from a young age were more than twice as likely to get into top universities when they were older

A student’s university options could be determined from as young as ten, new research has shown, following warnings that the most disadvantaged young people still face too many challenges when applying for higher education.

New schools funding scheme to be delayed by a year

by BBC, July 21, 2016

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The implementation of a new national funding formula for schools will be delayed by a year, Education Secretary Justine Greening has told MPs.
The government had been planning to bring in the new funding scheme in England from 2017-18 - but it will now apply from 2018-19, she said.
"We must get our approach right," Ms Greening told the Commons.
Labour's shadow education secretary Angela Rayner criticised the delay as "woeful".

University tuition fees rise to £9,250 for current students

by BBC News, July 21, 2016

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University tuition fees in England will rise to £9,250 per year from 2017 and the increase could apply to students who have already started courses.
Universities minister Jo Johnson has published a statement setting out plans to link higher fees to better teaching.
The fees will increase by inflation in subsequent years.
The Liberal Democrats say they will force a vote by MPs in the autumn in a bid to stop raising the current £9,000 limit.

English universities to raise tuition fees for first time since they trebled

by Guardian Education , July 20, 2016

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Universities in England have started telling potential students that their tuition fees will go up across the board from next year, the first rise since fees were nearly trebled to £9,000 in 2012.

Manchester and Durham are among universities already listing annual undergraduate fees as rising to £9,250, following an announcement by higher education minister Jo Johnson that universities meeting expectations under the first year of the new teaching excellence framework (TEF) were able to raise them from September 2017.

A government spokesperson said: “The ability to maintain fees in line with inflation has been in place since 2004, and is subject to regulations. This is not part of the higher education and research bill.

“The teaching excellence framework will allow universities to maintain fees in line with inflation only if they meet a quality bar, as set out in the recent higher education white paper.”

Manchester University told students thinking of applying to begin studying next year that “these fees are regulated by the UK government, and so may increase each year in line with government policy. For entry into 2017-18, there is a possible increase of 2.8%”.

Final approval will come when the government presents the increase to parliament later this year, but that is expected to be a formality after Johnson announced in May that fees for 2017-18 would rise by 2.8%.

“The £9,000 tuition fee introduced in 2012 has already fallen in value to £8,500 in real terms. If we leave it unchanged, it will be worth £8,000 by the end of this parliament. We want to ensure that our universities have the funding they need and that every student receives a high-quality experience during their time in higher education,” Johnson told MPs.

Schools should be more than factories churning out Gradgrindian three Rs and imparting 'facts' with little space for creativity

by Telegraph, July 20, 2016

Classified as General.

As a nation we are struggling to maintain our position in so many areas of life, yet still we produce some of the greatest performers and artists in the world today.

However the branch of our educational machine that enables children to discover and develop the relevant talents is being starved into enforced mediocrity.

The Government is currently consulting on a new all-but-compulsory expectation that pupils in English state schools should study the EBacc qualifications to GCSE. Subjects such as music, art, drama and design will not count. Change is being driven by convenience and economy rather than a proper motivation to improve the educational experience of our young people.

Poor children lag behind in middle class schools, report finds

by Telegraph, July 20, 2016

Classified as General.

Poor pupils who are in the ‘extreme minority’ in middle-class schools are lagging behind their peers because teachers focus on the most able, a think tank has warned.

State schools with the lowest proportions of disadvantaged students have seen the progress gap widen, particularly at key stages 2 and 4, according to analysis by the Education Policy Institute (EPI).

The analysis showed that since 2006 the key stage 2 progress gap in these schools has risen from 1.1 to 2.6 months when it comes to academic attainment in maths and reading.

Schools should be more than factories churning out Gradgrindian three Rs and imparting 'facts' with little space for creativity

by Telegraph, July 20, 2016

Classified as General.

As a nation we are struggling to maintain our position in so many areas of life, yet still we produce some of the greatest performers and artists in the world today.

However the branch of our educational machine that enables children to discover and develop the relevant talents is being starved into enforced mediocrity.

Oxford college to increase intake of minority students following pressure to widen access

by Telegraph, July 20, 2016

Classified as General.

An Oxford college has announced it will increase the number of places by 10 per cent in an effort to widen access to students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

This is the first time an Oxford college will solely take pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds as part of an increase in undergraduate numbers.

Working parents face summer childcare struggle

by BBC, July 20, 2016

Classified as General.

Families face a struggle to find summer holiday childcare as councils across Britain report a lack of places.
In Wales and the east of England, none of the councils responding to a Family and Childcare Trust survey, said it had enough places for all age groups.
Average holiday childcare fees are down slightly on 2015 but remain 20% higher than in 2010, the study found.

NSPCC issues warning over leaving children home alone

by BBC, July 20, 2016

Classified as General.

As schools break up for the holidays, a children's charity is urging parents to think carefully before leaving children home alone over the summer.
The NSPCC says last summer its helpline received 453 calls and emails from adults concerned about youngsters being left unattended during the holidays.

More than three-quarters - 366 - were serious enough for information to be passed to police or social services.

Labour warns of rising tuition fees

by BBC News, July 19, 2016

Classified as General.

University tuition fees in England would face "significant rises" under plans being put forward by the government, says Labour's shadow education minister Gordon Marsden.
The government wants to allow fees to rise with inflation if universities have a high standard of teaching.
Mr Marsden said it gave universities "cash-in coupons" to raise their fees.
Education Secretary Justine Greening defended the need to protect the value of fees for "high quality providers".
Ms Greening, heading a department now responsible for higher education as well as schools, presented plans which will encourage more competition within higher education.

The education secretary told the House of Commons the changes would not reduce parliamentary scrutiny of the maximum level of fees in England, which is currently £9,000 per year.
"But what we are saying to high quality providers is you can access fees up to an inflation-linked maximum fee cap if, and only if, you can demonstrate that you are providing high quality teaching and you have an agreed access and participation plan in place."
But Mr Marsden said that in unpredictable economic times after the EU referendum, with no certainty on future levels of inflation, this could mean "significant rises in fee costs".

Academies warn Brexit 'damaging science'

by BBC, July 19, 2016

Classified as General.

The UK's national academies representing science, medicine and engineering have told the government that Brexit is already harming science.
A joint letter from seven academies says that the UK's world-leading position in these areas is in jeopardy.
The national academies represent the best researchers in their fields.
They call for the government to make a "bold public commitment" to prioritize research in Brexit negotiations.

What is the most effective way of helping children understand different cultures and different mind sets?

by School World, July 19, 2016

Classified as General.

Trying to understand a culture through the behaviour of people within that culture is difficult. We look at what others are doing, and have little reference point as to what makes them do what they do.

On the other hand if we start to investigate the whys and wherefores of behaviour in different cultures we can easily get bogged down in the complex historic details.

Detentions are in many cases an effective deterrent for repercussions of misbehaviour, but to what cost?

by Education News, July 19, 2016

Classified as General.

Nearly every secondary school I have visited or worked in uses the method of detention as a way of deterring pupils from breaking the school’s rules – which must mean that in more cases than not, it is a method of discipline that works.

However it is also a method that can significantly hinder the learning of pupils who have landed themselves in detention, particularly when they have been placed in isolation during lesson times.

Most agree: schools should have a constant ongoing plan to improve the efficiency of the school

by Education News, July 19, 2016

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In fact, it is more than “most” who agree. In research undertaken by the School of Educational Administration and Management, 82% of school managers and administrators agree that schools should have a constant ongoing plan to improve the efficiency of the school.

While a small minority continue with the view that efficiency is either not an issue that should bother schools at all or that efficiency savings can be introduced when something is noticed, most now share the mainstream view of organisations across the UK – we have to think about efficiency all the time.

Labour warns of rising tuition fees

by BBC, July 19, 2016

Classified as General.

University tuition fees in England would face "significant rises" under plans being put forward by the government, says Labour's shadow education minister Gordon Marsden.
The government wants to allow fees to rise with inflation if universities have a high standard of teaching.
Mr Marsden said it gave universities "cash-in coupons" to raise their fees.

England could be set for a new generation of grammar schools, Justine Greening suggests

by Daily Telegraph, July 18, 2016

Classified as General.

new generation of grammar schools could open in England under Theresa May’s government, the new Education Secretary has suggested.

Justine Greening said she was “open-minded” about the need for more of the selective schools in England and would seek to find out what role new grammar schools could play.

The comments will delight MPs who have been pressing for a return of more grammar schools for years after they were outlawed by Tony Blair in 1998.

Mrs May has previously expressed support for parents who want more places in academically selective schools, and backed plans for a grammar to be expanded in her own constituency.

Around a third of the new Cabinet are understood to have been educated at grammar schools. Mrs May’s new chief of staff, Nick Timothy, has also backed selective schools in the past.

Ms Greening told BBC1’s The Andrew Marr Show that she was “prepared to be open-minded” about opening new schools.

She said: “I recognise that this is an important debate, so of course I've got lots of things in my in-tray. I will work my way through them very, very carefully over the coming weeks.”

Asked if she was completely closed-minded to the idea, Ms Greening said: “I think that the education debate on grammar schools has been going for a very long time, but I also recognise that the landscape in which it takes place has changed fundamentally.

“We need to be able to move this debate on and look at things as they are today and maybe step away from a more old-fashioned debate around grammar schools and work out where they fit in today's landscape.”

Grammar schools are state secondaries that select their pupils by means of an examination at age 11. There are currently about 163 in England, out of some 3,000 state secondaries, and a further 69 in Northern Ireland.

But under the law created by the Labour government, no new grammar schools are allowed to open in England.

England could be set for a new generation of grammar schools, Justine Greening suggests

by Telegraph, July 18, 2016

Classified as General.

A new generation of grammar schools could open in England under Theresa May’s government, the new Education Secretary has suggested.

Justine Greening said she was “open-minded” about the need for more of the selective schools in England and would seek to find out what role new grammar schools could play.

The comments will delight MPs who have been pressing for a return of more grammar schools for years after they were outlawed by Tony Blair in 1998.

Boys 'twice as likely to fall behind girls' in early years

by BBC, July 18, 2016

Classified as General.

Boys are nearly twice as likely as girls to have fallen behind by the time they start school, a report says.
Save the Children says a quarter of boys in England - 80,000 - started reception class struggling to speak a full sentence or follow instructions.
The report, based on a University of Bristol study, says children who start school behind often never catch up.

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