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PostPosted: Wed Nov 08, 2017 12:40 pm 
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Foreseer wrote:
Based on the score released from reading school, we know there is a HUGE gap of ability difference among all year 6 kids. For argument sake, say in a class of 30 students, if 1/3 is below 70 mark, 1/3 is around 90 and the remaining is above 110, it must be very challenging for any teacher to effectively and productively teach the lesson, pitching the lesson at a level that suits those who scored 90 mark is too high for lower ability but too boring for the higher ability. It is a thought.

I disagree, I think what this shows are the kids who were tutored to death, those who are naturally bright and those who didn't prepare at all.


Last edited by BlueBerry on Wed Nov 08, 2017 3:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 08, 2017 12:52 pm 
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Foreseer wrote:
Based on the score released from reading school, we know there is a HUGE gap of ability difference among all year 6 kids. For argument sake, say in a class of 30 students, if 1/3 is below 70 mark, 1/3 is around 90 and the remaining is above 110, it must be very challenging for any teacher to effectively and productively teach the lesson, pitching the lesson at a level that suits those who scored 90 mark is too high for lower ability but too boring for the higher ability. It is a thought.


This is not how standardisation works. If this school has used the standard deviation of 15, it means that one-third of the cohort will be between the average (mark 100) and the one standard deviation above (mark 115). It also means that one-third of the cohort will be between the average and one standard deviation below (between 100 and 85). The remaining third are split in two, with one-sixth being above 115, up to around 141 (the top mark) and the other one-sixth being below 85, down to around 59 (the bottom mark).

The point is that the marks are dependent on the cohort. If, say, you were only testing the top 10% of the population, you'd still have someone at the bottom on 59 and someone at the top on 141, and the average would still be 100. You can't tell how much the ability of the cohort varies by these scores - all you can tell is how each child performed relative to everyone else who took the test.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 08, 2017 1:06 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2012 11:41 am
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Location: Essex
BlueBerry wrote:
Foreseer wrote:
Based on the score released from reading school, we know there is a HUGE gap of ability difference among all year 6 kids. For argument sake, say in a class of 30 students, if 1/3 is below 70 mark, 1/3 is around 90 and the remaining is above 110, it must be very challenging for any teacher to effectively and productively teach the lesson, pitching the lesson at a level that suits those who scored 90 mark is too high for lower ability but too boring for the higher ability. It is a thought.

I disagree, I think what this shows are the kids who were tutored to death, those who are naturally bright and those who didn't prepare at all. From my group of friends, I know of 6 boys and their scores are above 110. These boys have been preparing for this test since year 3 by attending specific 11+ courses, they have also attended intensive courses in year 5 at Easter, May half term and 2x intensive summer courses.



These are standardised scores. Standardised against the cohort which sat this particular test, nominating this particular school, not a national cohort of the relevant age group. So those with scores of 85 - 115 will have raw scores within approximately one standard deviation of the mean raw score for that test. A test taken not by a fully representative sample of the local male year 6 population, let alone the local male year 6 population in its entirety, but a population of boys selected, the vast majority of them, by parents who have proof of their high academic ability relative to their peers, a belief in the same (accurate or not) or at least a belief that said boys are capable of being coached well enough to get them a place. Plus the odd few whose parents either know or don't realise that they don't stand a chance or who think that they ought to, but believe that they have to do it on their own merit.

So the boys with the standardised score of 70 may actually have a raw score of a perfectly good level to achieve pretty good GCSEs, without being a strain on the resources of their teachers or on the patience of their classmates.

Cross posted with streathammum :D

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 26, 2018 8:30 am 
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Hello friend,

As the March 1st date is approaching , I am getting slightly nervy about the chances of my son getting a confirmed place in the Reading School.

His score as a day scholar is 111.90

Given SEN, PUPIL PREMIUM, Late Sitters etc, the information of whose exact numbers is not yet known, what do you think chances of my son are for making it to the school?

A nervy dad


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 26, 2018 10:15 am 
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Joined: Mon May 16, 2011 1:05 pm
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Location: Reading
If you look at the historic data for Reading here. viewtopic.php?f=10&t=44653

The cutoff last year was below your DSs score. There’s a similar number of qualified in catchment boys this year to last year. We don’t know the numbers of SEN, PP etc, but I wouldn’t expect those numbers to be high, or wildly different from last year anyway.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 07, 2018 7:41 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jan 21, 2017 2:33 pm
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Horizon04 wrote:
Hello friend,

As the March 1st date is approaching , I am getting slightly nervy about the chances of my son getting a confirmed place in the Reading School.

His score as a day scholar is 111.90

Given SEN, PUPIL PREMIUM, Late Sitters etc, the information of whose exact numbers is not yet known, what do you think chances of my son are for making it to the school?

A nervy dad


Don't get too nervous. Your DS has high chances of getting a place in Reading School. Few things to bear in mind all qualified pupil will choose Reading as Option 1 in CAF and qualified SEN and PP pupil are handful of them. Good Luck!


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 07, 2018 7:48 pm 
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Few things to bear in mind all qualified pupil will choose Reading as Option 1 in CAF


Actually, not all will put Reading as option 1. Some of those qualified will decide to go private, some will put other schools (maybe a Slough school for instance) as option 1,with Reading as a lower option.


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 18, 2018 8:37 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jan 21, 2017 2:33 pm
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Tinkers wrote:
Quote:
Few things to bear in mind all qualified pupil will choose Reading as Option 1 in CAF


Actually, not all will put Reading as option 1. Some of those qualified will decide to go private, some will put other schools (maybe a Slough school for instance) as option 1,with Reading as a lower option.



I meant not all qualified will put down as Reading School on CAF :)


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