Go to navigation
It is currently Sat Apr 10, 2021 10:47 pm

All times are UTC [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2017 12:25 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Mar 01, 2017 11:22 pm
Posts: 143
Hi all as the result day draws nearer, I am still confused with the raw score/ standardised score for the 11+ exam.
I have tried reading and re-reading the sections and links regarding this.

For example if DS who is June born, needs to achieve a safe score of about 230 in the Birmingham exam, what pass percentage of the exam will he have needed to pass?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2017 12:38 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 2:21 pm
Posts: 16254
Nobody knows as it will vary according to the raw marks of the children sitting each year.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2017 12:41 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Mar 01, 2017 11:22 pm
Posts: 143
Thank you Guest55


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2017 12:55 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2016 6:02 pm
Posts: 1183
Standardisation works approximately like this (assuming they're using a standard deviation of 15):

All the raw scores are ranked from bottom to top. So for a test out of 70, the lowest mark might be 15 and the highest mark might be 69. The person who gets 15 is given a standardised score of 60. The person who gets 69 is given a standardised score of 140.

Then all the raw scores are averaged and it's found that the mean average score was 52. So everyone who scores 52 is given a standardised score of 100.

The rest of the raw scores are then distributed along the curve. The distribution will be such that two-thirds of the cohort will score between 85 and 115 and the other third is split so that one-sixth is between 60 and 84 and the other sixth is between 116 and 140.

Hopefully you can see that you can't work out the raw score from the standardised score. The raw score you need to pass can vary year on year, perhaps because a test one year might be unusually easy or difficult - it won't affect the standardised score because people will still be distributed along the same curve.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2017 4:15 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Mar 01, 2017 11:22 pm
Posts: 143
streathammum wrote:
Standardisation works approximately like this (assuming they're using a standard deviation of 15):

All the raw scores are ranked from bottom to top. So for a test out of 70, the lowest mark might be 15 and the highest mark might be 69. The person who gets 15 is given a standardised score of 60. The person who gets 69 is given a standardised score of 140.

Then all the raw scores are averaged and it's found that the mean average score was 52. So everyone who scores 52 is given a standardised score of 100.

The rest of the raw scores are then distributed along the curve. The distribution will be such that two-thirds of the cohort will score between 85 and 115 and the other third is split so that one-sixth is between 60 and 84 and the other sixth is between 116 and 140.

Hopefully you can see that you can't work out the raw score from the standardised score. The raw score you need to pass can vary year on year, perhaps because a test one year might be unusually easy or difficult - it won't affect the standardised score because people will still be distributed along the same curve.


Thank you so much streathammum!
Your reply has made things alot more clearer. :D
Roll on next Friday


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 22 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Privacy Policy | Refund Policy | Disclaimer | Copyright © 2004 – 2021