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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2019 7:23 am 
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Joined: Sat Oct 13, 2018 4:00 pm
Posts: 310
For people considering a grammar school that they live quite far away from, do consider the effect of tiredness on your child. My child has a fairly long bus journey, so evenings are pretty much dinner, homework, bed. It's great when they get into the grammar school but remember, the child has to cope with the reality of going there every day and doing all the work - and still enjoy school. It's particularly difficult for them in the winter months getting up in the dark.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2019 7:34 am 
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Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2016 5:02 pm
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Hi Deb70, this is a very thoughtful post. Would you mind if I ask you how long your DC's journey is, door to door, to give others an idea of what you mean by a "long" journey?


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2019 7:38 am 
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It's 18 miles and takes 50 minutes depending on traffic etc. Also consider how they will get to/from after school clubs and things.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2019 9:19 am 
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Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2010 2:45 pm
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50 minutes isn't bad considering the distance. We live less than 5 miles from school and it can take half an hour on the school bus in traffic (usually 20 minutes, 10 by car). It's a good point about after school activities - although we fairly close (for Buckinghamshire!) there are no public transport links so if we are at work we cannot collect them from after school activities. This is our only catchment grammar school.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2019 10:16 am 
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Deb70 wrote:
It's 18 miles and takes 50 minutes depending on traffic etc. Also consider how they will get to/from after school clubs and things.


That's not bad at all! We live 4 miles from the school and my son's journey is around 30mins door to door.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2019 12:43 pm 
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Joined: Wed Mar 08, 2017 10:21 pm
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DD's journey is 18 miles and takes 45 minutes. Helpfully, school is really conscious that children travel and therefore there are lots of clubs at lunchtimes. However, there are some after school. We've teamed up with other parents and we lift share back so it's not every night or even every week.

The days are already lengthening out so almost back into daylight when we leave and already in daylight in the evening again:)

I would say be conscious of the amount of activities on - DD threw herself into loads in the first term and has eased back a little this term so give herself more space / time!


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2019 12:45 pm 
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Joined: Wed Mar 08, 2017 10:21 pm
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PS travel time can be good - my dd uses it to listen to audio books & learn her singing music!


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2019 1:26 pm 
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Joined: Mon May 16, 2011 1:05 pm
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Location: Reading
It’s not just long journey times/distances. Think about how your DC will be able to do stuff after school and how they will get home then. Many schools have school buses, but if that is all there is, then DC can’t stay after school. Is there an alternative?

Of course some parents don’t see after school activities as important, but it isn’t just those.

It’s the staying with friends to work in group homework (especially if they live miles apart as well).
Some schools offer revision or booster classes after school (as well as lunchtimes) or some teachers offer their time after school to help students.for some it’s a good time to do the required coursework. (Less of an issue with the new GCSEs, but some subjects will still have an element).
Heaven forbid, but after school detentions can and do happen.
School trips can leave early or return late.
If they can’t get back under their own steam, you will need to pick them up.

Also don’t forget, you as parents will also need to go to the school yourselves. Parents evenings, information evenings, if they are ill etc. So remember to factor that in too.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2019 1:42 pm 
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Joined: Sat Oct 13, 2018 4:00 pm
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I do think it affects performance. Not in DCs favourite/stronger subjects as he is at/near the top in those. But in subjects he's not as keen on, he has let work slip a few times because he's tired. We are planning to move closer, but complicated by youngest DC not passing and awaiting SR.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2019 5:08 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 16, 2015 11:01 am
Posts: 104
We are very luck that my DS will be attending a school that is a 20-25 min walk away from home. The GS doesn't have a catchment area so there are children from far and wide who will be attending the school and there are very few 'school' buses. We have already got one of his friends who is likely to be walking back with my DS and staying with us until his parents can collect him. I have no issue with this and expect that our house will become a 'go to' house for his mates. We have a games room/library downstairs so that will become the den for the kids to do homework together and play on the xbox! I already expect I'll have to buy lots of snacks for them all but tbh I like that idea (although ask me again in a years time and I might have a different opinion)!

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