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PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2019 9:09 am 
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What is the highest possible mark a child could score in the 11+ exam?


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2019 9:34 am 
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The scores are standardised so even if you knew the top score, your childs score isn't "out of" that.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2019 9:46 am 
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What is the process of standardising?- can you work backwards from that to get your original score? And why the mystery? Why don't they give a simple score 'out of' and then say this is standardised to 'this' to take account of birthdays... (and ... what else do they take account of?...) Do you get an idea of how many incorrect/ or correct answers for each section of the child's exam paper?


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2019 9:57 am 
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jacquie wrote:
What is the process of standardising?- can you work backwards from that to get your original score? And why the mystery? Why don't they give a simple score 'out of' and then say this is standardised to 'this' to take account of birthdays... (and ... what else do they take account of?...) Do you get an idea of how many incorrect/ or correct answers for each section of the child's exam paper?


Because a simple score "out-of" is irrelevant to the process. All they want to know is how they compare to one another. In fact what they seem to want is how they would compare to one another if they were all the same age! If the test is harder than last year the scores would all look lower until they move the average (and the opposite if the questions turn out easier). This way the scores should be more comparable across different test papers and different years (assuming a normal distribution and that the average level hasn't moved much in reality).

Is there a reason you think the "real" scores would be useful?


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2019 10:11 am 
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darkmuseuk wrote:
Is there a reason you think the "real" scores would be useful?


Someone asked me 'why' and I didn't know the answer....she wanted to be able to compare the scores her child is getting in practice papers- the CGP ones are 'out of' 175. So children she knows are getting scores given like 247, 220 in the 11+ exam results and she wondered about it-and asked me '"what are these scores out of"


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2019 10:32 am 
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jacquie wrote:
darkmuseuk wrote:
Is there a reason you think the "real" scores would be useful?


Someone asked me 'why' and I didn't know the answer....she wanted to be able to compare the scores her child is getting in practice papers- the CGP ones are 'out of' 175. So children she knows are getting scores given like 247, 220 in the 11+ exam results and she wondered about it-and asked me '"what are these scores out of"


Ah yes, it doesn't work like that. But someone might be able to tell you what sort of percentage on the CGP tests would normally translate into a grammar place. There are details of standardisation on the site here - https://www.elevenplusexams.co.uk/advic ... xplanation


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2019 10:34 am 
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That's great darkmuseuk, thank you. I will forward that to her.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2019 12:37 pm 
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I am not sure what the CGP tests are but Warwickshire is CEM testing.

It is in a sense irrelevant what the score is - the ranking is more important as if the top child only scores x in the 11+ and your child scores x-1 (and nobody else scores the same as them) they will be the top child and the second top child for that cohort and will be ranked 1 and 2 and get the first 2 places.

X could represent 25 or 250 as a score - but is irrelevant.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2019 12:47 pm 
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kenyancowgirl wrote:
I am not sure what the CGP tests are but Warwickshire is CEM testing.

It is in a sense irrelevant what the score is - the ranking is more important as if the top child only scores x in the 11+ and your child scores x-1 (and nobody else scores the same as them) they will be the top child and the second top child for that cohort and will be ranked 1 and 2 and get the first 2 places.

X could represent 25 or 250 as a score - but is irrelevant.


I thought I read the ranking was not included this year?


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2019 1:33 pm 
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They haven't given you the ranking the last two years until after NAD, to be fair, my point was that the score is irrelevant, it is where your child comes in the cohort that is important. One year getting a very low score (which will then be standardised) will get a child a place, the next year a very high score (which will then be standardised) will be needed - the cohort and your childs relative position within it is the deciding factor, not their actual score.


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