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PostPosted: Fri Feb 05, 2010 8:08 am 
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Joined: Wed Nov 14, 2007 2:02 pm
Posts: 663
Location: Herts
Grrr. I am definitely feeling tense this morning!

My DD (just 13) has a regulation school skirt to be worn no more than 3 inches above the knee. This morning she attempted to leave the house with what looked like only 3 inches of skirt on show altogther!! :shock: It looked extra bad (to my eye) because she was wearing light coloured tights & had her school shirt pulled down over the top (another breach of rules - should be tucked in).

I know she wants to push the boundaries but she looked ridiculous and it's obviously so inappropriate. Her school are strict on uniform & I don't imagine she would get very far through the day looking like that. But I hate to think that on the three days I leave before her she might have been going out looking like that (OH useless in morning - probably wouldn't notice if she was wearing a showgirl costume).

I got cross with DD & she has gone off in a huff. I should have handled it better. Generally speaking, DD works really hard, throws herself into extra-cirricular activities & is pretty much a model student.

But I cannot turn a blind eye to the skirt. I know it's a small thing in the overall scheme of things but I'd be really grateful for any advice please.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 05, 2010 8:35 am 
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Almost word-for-word what I could have written just before Christmas..even down to the row on leaving the house...DD in year 8, skirt rolled over at waistband x times, and styled like St Trinian's escapee...yet you watch them come out of school, and it's much more conformist, so either they've been 'told' or they auto-adjust as they go in...I wish I too could not get so wound up about the small things - hormones on both fronts, I suspect!


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 05, 2010 8:37 am 
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Location: london
Me too, completely the same. I managed to avoid a row this morning employing a strategy I would heartily recommend...I stayed in bed and didn't see her :shock: feel much better for it :lol:

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 05, 2010 8:40 am 
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LOL - when I went to school the boudaries were being pushed to wear longer skirts... remember the midi and the maxi????

supposed to be "no lower than the knee...." ho ho then of course they got shorter again.....

Seems to be a universal problem, they are pushing the boundaries. My headteacher tended to ignore sucj things so long as the skirt was the right colour - think we got bored of trying to rebel and took up student politics instead ..


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 05, 2010 8:49 am 
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Joined: Tue Sep 22, 2009 2:14 pm
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Location: essex
My eldest daughter's school changed their uniform a couple of years ago to avoid this problem...non roll-upable skirts apparently....my ****.

The main offender at her school is actually the Geography teacher, eye wateringly short skirts and high boots. Luckily the male ones are still in cardigans with elbow patches.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 05, 2010 8:52 am 
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My poor dd is hitching her skirt up already (year 7), but only because the skirts I bought her to start school in are now too big and keep falling down - I really need to get to the school outfitters :shock: All the walking she does now (to get to school and around it) has done her the power of good :D :D

Even though there is a regulation length in dd's school there are girls who wear their skirts very short - admittedly only a few, but that's why they're so noticeable!

I can't speak, my skirts used to be literally up my bottom :shock: :lol:

I guess it's one of these times when you have to pick and chose your battles (ie: it's not THAT important in the scheme of things).

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 05, 2010 8:59 am 
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Generally I would leave the uniform issue to the school but there is a side of it that worries me with the girls being in public like this.
I don't for one minute think that it is deliberate on their part but sometimes they are unintentionally giving out certain messages by the way they dress.
I do think that they need to understand that how they dress effects how other people see them & will behave towards them - both during the day & in the evenings as they get older & go out to clubs etc.
I suspect that what we find acceptable as parents is probably too conservative :) but equally we do have a responsibilty to set some boundaries with dress as with everything else!


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 05, 2010 8:59 am 
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I have one in year 7 and one in year 9.The yr 7 has not started skirt rolling but that's because its usually not on the curriculum until yr 8. :D
Their school is very strict about it and my yr 9 DD has told me that the SLT stand outside assembly and look at the skirt lines as they go on.If they get pulled over they get a "strike", 3 and there's a detention.The same applies as they walk around school each day.This doesn't stop them arriving and departing with shorter skirts. :roll:
To be fair , it is a dreadful A line skirt that is utterly unflattering and it looks more straight rolled up.

Now that eldest one is 14, some of her peers are going to under 18s might at the local nightclub, some of her peers are " experimenting " with alcohol and other pursuits. :? She, like your daughter Tense, is essentially a rule abiding girl who does what asked of her school work wise and does well.She has a few huffs here and there, but at the moment she is not the cause for concern that some of her peers could be.Therefore I would turn a blind eye as there may, or may not, be more important issues later where you will have to go to battle stations.
A little rebellion (note little) must surely be a healthy sign in some ways.....?


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 05, 2010 9:28 am 
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Joined: Sun Dec 14, 2008 8:57 pm
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Location: London
I agree with the little rebellion being a good thing. I make a sufficient fuss over the skirt rolling issue so she knows I disapprove but don't turn it into a big deal so we both get miserable. I want her to feel its a rebellion of sorts so that she doesnt feel the need to do genuine rebellion and take up smoking or whatever

its the usual pick your battles issues but I definitely feel that they're hardwired to want to do some stuff we dont agree with so its a good policy to make sure you find some things you can disapprove of that are not actually that critical.

Hopefully you can do something nice together at the weeknd and forget the crossness!


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 05, 2010 9:31 am 
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Chelmsford mum wrote:
The yr 7 has not started skirt rolling but that's because its usually not on the curriculum until yr 8. :D



Oh CM - I really got the giggles.... is it a modular assessment? do the boys do this part of the curriculum as well or have they got seperate lessons...?


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