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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2018 3:20 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jan 24, 2011 4:33 pm
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Location: Buckinghamshire
e.g. "My son is appearing for XYZ school exam this weekend"

I've seen this phrase used a lot on the forum and am curious about its origins. Up until I came on this site a few years ago I'd never seen or heard the phrase and I don't think I've encountered it being used for GCSEs or A-levels, it seems to be a phrase used exclusively when describing an 11+ or independent school test.

Does it originate from a particular region of England or is it a term used overseas that's becoming more commonplace here? My family's got some interesting overseas heritage and none of them have come across it before, either.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2018 3:30 pm 
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Location: Buckinghamshire
I was once told that it (and also the phrase to "write" the test/exam) derives from Hindi.

As to why it might be used more commonly to apply to school entrance tests, I have no idea.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2018 3:32 pm 
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It does seem to be South Asian in origin.

I've seen the following recently:

      "Any idea how many appeared and how many cleared?" (= how many took/sat the test, and how many qualified/got through?)

      "Why don't the parents shift if they think that a particular school is that important?" (= move house)

      "To get a seat at the school" (= to get a place)

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2018 3:39 pm 
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Ive also seen numerous times, ‘DC gave the exam’.

All these were new to me. All I’d heard was ‘sitting’ and ‘taking’ exams.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2018 3:44 pm 
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Yes, I was about to say "to give an exam". The only place I have ever heard these phrases is on here.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2018 3:49 pm 
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Interesting, thanks everyone. Yes, I've come across references to "seats" rather than "places", which makes the school sound like an aeroplane! I'd put "give the exam" down to a phrase someone using English as a second language might mistakenly use in much the same way I rather embarrassed myself by asking for a "choc au pain" in France many years ago :oops:, but "appearing for the exam" is used so often (and I believe it is grammatically correct) that I thought it must have its origins from somewhere.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2018 4:17 pm 
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"Kids" often seems to be used instead of "children", even in a formal context (such as a letter of appeal) where "children" would probably be more appropriate.

We do, of course, have our own language on the forum - "Good luck to all the DCs sitting the test!" :?

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2018 11:06 pm 
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I absolutely hate the term kids. It seems to me a really slang term, you don't hear teachers using it. I am amazed to hear parents would use it in a formal letter.

I would never use it. I have never called my children kids. They don't use it either. They refer to themselves as daughters, never kids. DG


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2018 11:40 pm 
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Quote:
I am amazed to hear parents would use it in a formal letter.
Where we've come across this on the Appeals forum, I don't think they have ever been native speakers of English.

Quote:
you don't hear teachers using it
However, there was once a Conservative Secretary of State for Education who referred to "kids" in some of his public utterances! :?

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