Go to navigation
It is currently Tue Feb 20, 2018 5:11 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 24 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Sun Nov 19, 2017 5:03 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Mar 08, 2017 10:21 pm
Posts: 118
Hi

Does anyone have any experience of the above? Would you recommend it? How does it compare to Girl Guides / Scouts or something similar?

I have a 10 year old DD who is keen on being a doctor (since a very young age, due to her own personal health experience). We're keeping a very open mind as it might all change when she gets older!

Any views welcome...or alternatives?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Nov 19, 2017 8:29 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Mar 04, 2008 2:28 pm
Posts: 2791
A family friend did St John's for several years and found it helpful in terms of experience and for application to med school however they were more like 14-18 when they did it and therefore had greater responsibility.

Advantage of scouts etc is the range of experiences on offer, assuming it is a well run group.

I think at this age I would look at specifics of your local options including logistics re family life and how things feed in to older groups, thinking about independent traveling to and fro when older if appropriate as well as how much the actual groups do - standards vary greatly.

As you say, very early days to be focussing on just one career path so I'd be thinking about developing all life skills and broadening experience for a few years before focussing in too much.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2017 9:44 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Mar 08, 2017 10:21 pm
Posts: 118
Thanks. I was interested because SJA website says that they have youth programmes (Badgers for 7-10 years & Cadets 10-17 years) with a fun, community & skills development programme...I guess like anything it depends on the local group...


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2017 9:50 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Nov 27, 2014 4:04 pm
Posts: 1167
Many many years ago I went to one of these groups when I was around 10-12.

I really enjoyed it. Having now had children who have been through Brownies/Guides and Cubs/Boys Brigade, it seems to me that it is fairly similar in that there are lots of fun activities but with more of a focus on First Aid etc and the ability to take part in different events.

As it happens, I then became a doctor but I don't think my experiences in St Johns led to that!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2017 9:53 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 1:21 pm
Posts: 14177
We have local Badgers and Cadets groups and they seem to do a lot of different things.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2017 9:59 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2012 11:41 am
Posts: 7002
Location: Essex
With Scouts you get to do First Aid and Axe and Knife training :D

_________________
Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read.Groucho Marx


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2017 10:06 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Nov 27, 2014 4:04 pm
Posts: 1167
ToadMum wrote:
With Scouts you get to do First Aid and Axe and Knife training :D

Sounds like one might be quite useful for the other :lol:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2017 10:50 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Sep 24, 2009 10:59 am
Posts: 7051
One thing I would say to anyone in this position, is please, do not let your young child's 'ambition' become a self-fulfilling prophecy that they can't see or talk their way out of when they are older. My DD also wanted to be a doctor from when she was very small. She chose her A levels and more than attained the grades needed. It was a kind of a 'given' that she would go to Medical school.

Somewhere very late on in sixth form, she started questioning whether it was the right thing or whether she had sleepwalked into it, and then been carried along by a combination of academic excellence, really loving her voluntary work at a care home, and encouraging teachers (we parents maintained a stony silence all along, so I have a clear conscience). It did become quite a personal crisis in the end, though happily after some time out between school and finally going to university to study something totally different, DD ended up where she should be and is much more comfortable. But now when I hear stories of tiny tots wanting to do Medicine I worry very slightly, as it often means they don't look elsewhere or consider other options at all, and it is quite hard to turn round and say 'no, I don't want to do that', once everyone has assumed that that is the next step.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2017 11:10 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 21, 2013 7:59 pm
Posts: 4144
+1.

I also worry that often it is not driven by the child but an enthusiastic parent or well meaning relative.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2017 11:12 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 1:21 pm
Posts: 14177
+ 1 also agree

Just go on 'The student room' website and read the many stories of an 'expectation' that the eldest son in some families will be a Doctor.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 24 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
CALL 020 8204 5060
   
Privacy Policy | Refund Policy | Disclaimer | Copyright © 2004 – 2018