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 Post subject: ADD
PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2018 1:18 pm 
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Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2011 1:25 pm
Posts: 2113
Hi All,
This is tough for me to write, but I believe and have done for a while, that my DS may have some form of ADD. The school isn't brilliant when it comes to SEN. (Unless they can show of how fab they are for the ofsted peeps). Very often he is just seen as naughty, mischeivous or 'has character'.
any advice on where to go, what specific symptoms would be very much appreciated before I consider taking it further.


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 Post subject: Re: ADD
PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2018 1:30 pm 
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Joined: Wed Oct 12, 2011 8:34 pm
Posts: 1184
Hi, I can recommend the Dyscovery centre as a place I have found to be very helpful and supportive. I recognise the neurodiversity in me and my family and learning more about it has made a huge difference. Thomas Phelan’s book are very helpful too....the one about adolescents is particularly helpful....

https://www.amazon.co.uk/All-About-ADHD ... mas+phelan

http://dyscovery.southwales.ac.uk
There could be something else going on like dyspraxia ...I went to the dyspraxia foundation conference last week and there was an amazing guy speaking who had been written off at school as a naughty kid who couldn’t learn. In his 40s he has discovered he has dyspraxia and is currently studying law at university after he was seen arguing his own defence in court. Subtle things put kids off learning and cause them to switch off...I hope you find a way to help your son thrive...


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 Post subject: Re: ADD
PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2018 2:14 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 1:21 pm
Posts: 16127
That sounds like ADHD as ADD does not have a 'behaviour' element although 'day dreaming' can be a symptom. Maybe go and raise it with the school? Some schools tend to overlook SEN in able children; it can be masked as they aren't seen as 'struggling' academically.


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 Post subject: Re: ADD
PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2018 3:19 pm 
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Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2011 1:25 pm
Posts: 2113
Thanks to you both.
Sadly the school, although classes outstanding in all areas is notoriously bad among parents at such things. So I am going to pursue this in spite of them. As he's just about to move to year 7 it seems like the right time. DC17C, the Dyscovery centre looks interesting. :-)


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 Post subject: Re: ADD
PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2018 6:02 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 1:21 pm
Posts: 16127
You could explore getting an Ed Psych report - AD(H)D needs a medical diagnosis but can be signposted by an Ed Psych.


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 Post subject: Re: ADD
PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2018 6:30 pm 
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Joined: Thu Nov 27, 2014 4:04 pm
Posts: 1752
Nowadays in most parts of the country AD(H)D can only be diagnosed via CAMHS. The community paediatricians who used to do this are now only seeing children aged 5 and under.
Most CAMHS will not accept a referral for this from a GP but only from the school.
And even then, most will only agree to see them if the symptoms are relatively severe.
Sorry but this is the situation where I am locally and I was speaking to a friend (who believes her dd also has ADHD) just last night in a completely different part of the country and the scenario is exactly the same.
Unfortunately we then have a situation where many parents (understandably) decide to go privately and I have never see a child who has seen a private child psychiatrist and not come out with diagnoses (plural) and medication which makes it difficult to fully trust them...


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 Post subject: Re: ADD
PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2018 6:43 pm 
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Joined: Thu Sep 24, 2009 10:59 am
Posts: 8056
In light of what Looby says, can I ask, do you need a label? Suppose you just address the behaviour, and the issues it raises, and try to wait and see someone on the NHS, whenever that is?. I agree about private (Ed) Psychs etc - they seem from what I can tell to need to diagnose something, and don't like sending away a child and saying nothing is 'wrong'. Not to be too sceptical as I know that there are many 'real' things out there, but the sudden rise in all manner of processing disorders, deficit disorders etc does rather lead to the idea that many of these things are variations of 'normal'. Whatever normal is. We do rather try to fit children into a very constraining education system from a very young age and if they struggle with any aspect of that - behavioural or academic - we are pretty quick to label them.

I do remember reading about a child who had something called Oppositional Defiance Disorder (ODD!). The main symptom was that he didn't like to be told 'no'. I think I know one or two others with this...

Disclaimer: I am not in any way casting doubt on the existence of a range of behavioural and academic difficulties and deficits. I am merely suggesting that seeking a label does not always provide any more answers than dealing with the very real manifestations of the disorder would.


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 Post subject: Re: ADD
PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2018 7:14 pm 
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Joined: Wed Oct 12, 2011 8:34 pm
Posts: 1184
stroudydad wrote:
Thanks to you both.
Sadly the school, although classes outstanding in all areas is notoriously bad among parents at such things. So I am going to pursue this in spite of them. As he's just about to move to year 7 it seems like the right time. DC17C, the Dyscovery centre looks interesting. :-)

The staff at the Dyscovery centre are great..even just filling out the questionnaires helped to narrow things down to know I was right to persue getting some help. I think it can be difficult for boisterous boys with a bit of spirit...finding ways to help them use their energy well and not annoy others with impulsive behaviour must be a challenge.


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 Post subject: Re: ADD
PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2018 8:38 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jun 18, 2007 2:32 pm
Posts: 7391
Location: East Kent
Talk to your GP.
Gp’s referrals to paediatrician etc go through far quicker


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 Post subject: Re: ADD
PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2018 9:51 pm 
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Joined: Thu Nov 27, 2014 4:04 pm
Posts: 1752
yoyo123 wrote:
Talk to your GP.
Gp’s referrals to paediatrician etc go through far quicker

See above.
In all the areas I know, GPs can no longer refer for ADHD (unless child under 5) and paeds will no longer accept (unless under 5).
It has to be via school and to CAMHS.
I tried recently as a very insistent parent told me that the school were refusing to refer her kid who was bouncing around my room and I was fed up of bashing my head against that particular brick wall where she wouldn't listen to me... And the referral was rejected. (It later turned out that the school was going to refer but she thought I would help her to queue jump :evil: )
We used to refer to community paeds all the time for this but - along with most of the rest of the NHS - those services have largely been dismantled.


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