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 Post subject: Re: ADD
PostPosted: Fri Mar 23, 2018 9:18 am 
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Joined: Tue Jul 21, 2009 9:56 pm
Posts: 8920
Stroudydad, sorry to hear about this dilemma. I have no direct personal experience of going down this route so can't offer advice - other than to slightly echo Amber and say be aware of the pros and cons of asking for / agreeing to this before heading off in that direction.

Interesting to hear that in sme areas only a school can refer for ADHD. What about a homeschooled child?

In the meantime, as these things take a long time, whatever the outcome, is your son's school doing all they can to maintain his attention at the same time as reinforcing the positive and not the negative behaviours?


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 Post subject: Re: ADD
PostPosted: Fri Mar 23, 2018 11:57 am 
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I think there is something in seeing what those so call negative behaviours are all about. It definitely helps to focus in on positives and tune into what children really enjoy and spend time with them talking things through.


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 Post subject: Re: ADD
PostPosted: Fri Mar 23, 2018 12:18 pm 
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Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2011 1:25 pm
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I had written a lovely long reply to you all, but it seems to have not posted correctly.. will try again when I get chance:-)


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 Post subject: Re: ADD
PostPosted: Fri Mar 23, 2018 12:46 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2006 7:10 pm
Posts: 9235
Location: Buckinghamshire
stroudydad wrote:
I had written a lovely long reply to you all, but it seems to have not posted correctly.. will try again when I get chance:-)

Here it is - you meant to hit the Quote button on mystery's post, but accidentally hit the Report button instead! :lol: :lol:

stroudydad wrote:
He has a very good teacher this year who DS has really engaged with so it is going ok and he has made decent progress. Last year was a complete write off though, the teacher was only interested in teaching a whole group in one way if you know what I mean. I won't go into too much detail but it is becoming more and more apparent that the school is more worried about its perception that each individual child. It did truly used to be an 'outstanding' school in every way..(other than communication - the amount of times we've had letters home saying '**** needs 4 hens teeth for 9am tomorrow' sadly that has changed over the years.

We have mulled over the possibility for years, and haven't been keen to take it further, but after a recent discussion with a family friend, and discussion with current teacher we think it should be looked at, if only so he knows and understands doesn't just keep seeing himself as a naughty boy for some of the things he does now.


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 Post subject: Re: ADD
PostPosted: Fri Mar 23, 2018 12:49 pm 
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Thank you:-)


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 Post subject: Re: ADD
PostPosted: Fri Mar 23, 2018 6:14 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jul 21, 2009 9:56 pm
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Pleased to see you reported yourself at the same time as me. :lol:


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 Post subject: Re: ADD
PostPosted: Sat Mar 24, 2018 12:36 am 
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Joined: Tue Sep 03, 2013 9:59 am
Posts: 2543
Having a label may help you understand him better and get the right help. However, the downside is that having a label may make him accept his behaviour and not try to overcome his difficulties.

Most children don’t want to be different and feel embarrassed to be considered “mental”.
So, think carefully. Nothing stops you from making allowances or helping him.
There are a number of reasons why a child may not focus. I once asked my son if he could hear his teacher properly to which he answered, in front of the teacher, that he “switched off in the boring bits”!

Salsa


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 Post subject: Re: ADD
PostPosted: Sat Mar 24, 2018 7:57 am 
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And if it is severe, other advantages, I think, may be money to the school for a teaching assistant in the classroom, disability benefit for the parents if the child needs huge amounts of supervision so as not to be in danger, Ritalin on prescription.

It is the benefits for diagnosis of milder versions of these kinds of things that I have never seen written down - I guess it would include exam adjustments of various sorts?


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 Post subject: Re: ADD
PostPosted: Sun Mar 25, 2018 10:06 am 
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Joined: Fri Dec 19, 2014 7:58 pm
Posts: 717
Many of the young people that drop out of university have a late diagnosis and some of those are young people with ADD or ADHD. ADD and ADHD can often be compensated for in a school and home environment but it then becomes impossible for YP to cope away from home. I have attached a list of symptoms that a psychiatrist friend recommends people look at for self diagnosis. In my opinion it is better to get a diagnosis earlier rather than later. AD(H)D can lead to low self-esteem low self-confidence, under achievement, social anxiety, generalised anxiety and depression. As with ASD it can help many YP to understand why they are struggling with things that their class mates find simple such as keeping track of personal possessions. A diagnosis should not lead to complacency if explained properly. It is just a starting point from which each individual's symptoms (and every person with AD(H)D is different) can be addressed. For example someone who has little or no concept of time can learn how to estimate how long something is going to take to do by timing activities and then looking at their watch during the activity to stay on track.

Being easily distracted by things such as noises, activity, or other external events that others tend to ignore.
 
Difficulty paying attention or focusing, such as when reading or listening to others.
 
"Zoning out" without realizing it, even in the middle of a conversation.
 
Struggling to complete tasks, even ones that seem simple. A tendency to overlook details, leading to errors or incomplete work.
 
Poor listening skills, for example, having a hard time remembering conversations and following directions.
 
a tendency to become absorbed in tasks that are stimulating and rewarding. This paradoxical symptom is called hyperfocus.
 
Poor organizational skills

Tendency to procrastinate
 
Trouble starting and finishing projects
 
Chronic lateness
 
Frequently forgetting appointments, commitments, deadlines
 
Constantly losing or misplacing things
 
Underestimating the time it will take you to complete tasks.
 
 
 Frequently interrupt others or talk over them
 
Poor self-control, addictive tendencies
 
Blurting out thoughts that are rude or inappropriate without thinking
 
Acting recklessly or spontaneously without regard for consequences
 
Trouble behaving in socially appropriate ways (such as sitting still during a long meeting)
 
Easily flustered and stressed out
 
Irritability or short, often explosive, temper
 
Low self-esteem and sense of insecurity or underachievement
 
Trouble staying motivated
 
Hypersensitivity to criticism
 
Feelings of inner restlessness, agitation, racing thoughts
 
Getting bored easily, craving for excitement, tendency to take risks 
 
Talking excessively, doing a million things at once
 
Trouble sitting still, constant fidgeting
 
 
Inattention: Six or more symptoms of inattention for children up to age 16, or five or more for adolescents 17 and older and adults; symptoms of inattention have been present for at least 6 months, and they are inappropriate for developmental level:
 
o Often fails to give close attention to details or makes careless mistakes in schoolwork, at work, or with other activities.
o Often has trouble holding attention on tasks or play activities.
o Often does not seem to listen when spoken to directly.
o Often does not follow through on instructions and fails to finish schoolwork, chores, or duties in the workplace (e.g., loses focus, side-tracked).
o Often has trouble organizing tasks and activities.
o Often avoids, dislikes, or is reluctant to do tasks that require mental effort over a long period of time (such as schoolwork or homework).
o Often loses things necessary for tasks and activities (e.g. school materials, pencils, books, tools, wallets, keys, paperwork, eyeglasses, mobile telephones).
o Is often easily distracted
o Is often forgetful in daily activities.
o
o
 
Hyperactivity and Impulsivity: Six or more symptoms of hyperactivity-impulsivity for children up to age 16, or five or more for adolescents 17 and older and adults; symptoms of hyperactivity-impulsivity have been present for at least 6 months to an extent that is disruptive and inappropriate for the person’s developmental level:
o Often fidgets with or taps hands or feet, or squirms in seat.
o Often leaves seat in situations when remaining seated is expected.
o Often runs about or climbs in situations where it is not appropriate (adolescents or adults may be limited to feeling restless).
o Often unable to play or take part in leisure activities quietly.
o Is often “on the go” acting as if “driven by a motor”.
o Often talks excessively.
o Often blurts out an answer before a question has been completed.
o Often has trouble waiting his/her turn.
o Often interrupts or intrudes on others (e.g., butts into conversations or games)
In addition, the following conditions must be met:
o Several inattentive or hyperactive-impulsive symptoms were present before age 12 years. 
o Several symptoms are present in two or more setting, (such as at home, school or work; with friends or relatives; in other activities). 
o There is clear evidence that the symptoms interfere with, or reduce the quality of, social, school, or work functioning. 
o The symptoms are not better explained by another mental disorder (such as a mood disorder, anxiety disorder, dissociative disorder, or a personality disorder). The symptoms do not happen only during the course of schizophrenia or another psychotic disorder. 
o Based on the types of symptoms, three kinds (presentations) of ADHD can occur: 
o Combined Presentation: if enough symptoms of both criteria inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity were present for the past 6 months 
o Predominantly Inattentive Presentation: if enough symptoms of inattention, but not hyperactivity-impulsivity, were present for the past six months 
o Predominantly Hyperactive-Impulsive Presentation: if enough symptoms of hyperactivity-impulsivity, but not inattention, were present for the past six months. 
o Because symptoms can change over time, the presentation may change over time as well. 


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 Post subject: Re: ADD
PostPosted: Sun Mar 25, 2018 10:41 am 
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Joined: Thu Sep 24, 2009 10:59 am
Posts: 8056
Looking at that list I don't think I know anyone who doesn't display at least half a dozen of those traits, more in some circumstances.


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