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PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2018 1:16 pm 
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Tinkers wrote:
loobylou wrote:
Eccentric wrote:
One of my daughter's best friends has been told she will be disowned by her parents if she doesn't achieve all level 9's in her GCSE's (which is an unachievable target), the school are now aware but the pressure from her parents (according to my Dd, still continues). This girl is not allowed to participate in extra curricular activities


This is very sad. Hopefully the school can make it clear to the parents that they are being unrealistic. Grade 9s seem to me to be as much about luck on the day as anything else. How can you guarantee being in the top 3% in all your subjects? Craziness!


I believe there has been one ‘expert’ quoted in the press as saying they expect only a couple of students in the whole country to get all 9s. Can’t find it now obviously, but they gave a reasonably good statistical ananlysis to back up the statement.

Of course it is craziness. The introduction of level 9's has added an extra sphere to the stress already felt by our young people. It adds another level to strive for.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2018 1:30 pm 
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Why did they reverse the previous numerical gradng where '1' was the highest? So we can have '10' in a few years time ..


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2018 5:33 pm 
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Guest55 wrote:
Why did they reverse the previous numerical gradng where '1' was the highest? So we can have '10' in a few years time ..


:cry: :cry: :cry:


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2018 6:32 pm 
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ToadMum wrote:
cheerio1357 wrote:
It is quite sad that the holistic approach to education has not improved over the years. I speak from experience of having seen in my time so many pushy parents who deem their child a failure if they do not become a doctor or an engineer!




But that is the fault of the parents concerned, not of the education system, surely?
I am currently co-authoring a paper critiquing the introduction of a series of OECD tests for 5 year olds, which are being piloted in the only 3 countries to agree to run them. No prizes for guessing whether England is in the cohort which wouldn't touch them, or those who agreed. Our education system runs on high stakes testing; it has replaced actual learning to a huge extent, Nick Gibb feels we still don't have enough of it; and very sadly there is no discourse in what might be called the public space which opposes it.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2018 8:02 pm 
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Location: East Kent
Amber wrote:
ToadMum wrote:
cheerio1357 wrote:
It is quite sad that the holistic approach to education has not improved over the years. I speak from experience of having seen in my time so many pushy parents who deem their child a failure if they do not become a doctor or an engineer!




But that is the fault of the parents concerned, not of the education system, surely?
I am currently co-authoring a paper critiquing the introduction of a series of OECD tests for 5 year olds, which are being piloted in the only 3 countries to agree to run them. No prizes for guessing whether England is in the cohort which wouldn't touch them, or those who agreed. Our education system runs on high stakes testing; it has replaced actual learning to a huge extent, Nick Gibb feels we still don't have enough of it; and very sadly there is no discourse in what might be called the public space which opposes it.


Absolutely, Amber.
We now have the times tables tests, apparently this will mean that teachers can now see the gaps in their pupils’ learning and address that.
Gosh! Why have we never thought of checking their understanding before?
Thank goodness Nick Gibb thought of suggesting it.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:30 am 
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My youngest dd stayed has stayed on for sixth form at her grammar school. She had excellent gcse results and is predicted top grades for HER chosen a-levels, those being Spanish, Maths and Art. Obviously uni and career paths are being discussed now and after telling one of her teachers what she wanted to do for her career, the teacher’s response was ‘why on earth did you come to a grammar school?’ I wasn’t impressed :|

Oldest dd went the comp route, great gcse results, a-levels not so good but I think she’d decided by the end of year 12 she’d had enough of education. School pushed and pushed the uni route, so much so that of her friendship group of 8 that originally wanted to go to uni only 1 actually did. She’s been working in the city for almost 2 years and enjoying it.

Incidentally youngest dd wants to be a makeup artist :D She’s still keeping her options open and looking at uni for academic subjects, but at the end of the day it will be her choice and we’ll support her whatever she decides.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:41 am 
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Whoops posted on the wrong thread! :oops: :oops:


Last edited by Amber on Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:50 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:42 am 
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thankgoditsover wrote:
My youngest dd stayed has stayed on for sixth form at her grammar school. She had excellent gcse results and is predicted top grades for HER chosen a-levels, those being Spanish, Maths and Art. Obviously uni and career paths are being discussed now and after telling one of her teachers what she wanted to do for her career, the teacher’s response was ‘why on earth did you come to a grammar school?’ I wasn’t impressed :|

Oldest dd went the comp route, great gcse results, a-levels not so good but I think she’d decided by the end of year 12 she’d had enough of education. School pushed and pushed the uni route, so much so that of her friendship group of 8 that originally wanted to go to uni only 1 actually did. She’s been working in the city for almost 2 years and enjoying it.

Incidentally youngest dd wants to be a makeup artist :D She’s still keeping her options open and looking at uni for academic subjects, but at the end of the day it will be her choice and we’ll support her whatever she decides.


<waves> :D

DD having moved to 'a rival establishment' from the same school, I'd love to know which teacher that was :shock: . Surely, having spent all that money on the lovely new(now 'ish') Drama building, there was always the possibility that some would get interested in the less obvious aspects of the theatre? Your DD could get an Oscar for that one day...

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Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read.Groucho Marx


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:59 am 
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ToadMum wrote:
thankgoditsover wrote:
My youngest dd stayed has stayed on for sixth form at her grammar school. She had excellent gcse results and is predicted top grades for HER chosen a-levels, those being Spanish, Maths and Art. Obviously uni and career paths are being discussed now and after telling one of her teachers what she wanted to do for her career, the teacher’s response was ‘why on earth did you come to a grammar school?’ I wasn’t impressed :|

Oldest dd went the comp route, great gcse results, a-levels not so good but I think she’d decided by the end of year 12 she’d had enough of education. School pushed and pushed the uni route, so much so that of her friendship group of 8 that originally wanted to go to uni only 1 actually did. She’s been working in the city for almost 2 years and enjoying it.

Incidentally youngest dd wants to be a makeup artist :D She’s still keeping her options open and looking at uni for academic subjects, but at the end of the day it will be her choice and we’ll support her whatever she decides.


<waves> :D

DD having moved to 'a rival establishment' from the same school, I'd love to know which teacher that was :shock: . Surely, having spent all that money on the lovely new(now 'ish') Drama building, there was always the possibility that some would get interested in the less obvious aspects of the theatre? Your DD could get an Oscar for that one day...


Hi Toadmum, she refuses to tell me the name of the teacher as apparently ‘You have no filter Mum and I’ve got to still go to the school’ pft I’ve been known to be subtle, sometimes. :twisted:

Hope your dd is enjoying the change of scenery :D


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2018 11:36 am 
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thankgoditsover wrote:
Hi Toadmum, she refuses to tell me the name of the teacher as apparently ‘You have no filter Mum and I’ve got to still go to the school’ pft I’ve been known to be subtle, sometimes. :twisted:

That young lady will go far with that level of emotional intelligence at her age :D . Good for her.


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