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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2018 1:55 pm 
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Hi

With the stress of entrance exam now out of the way, I was wondering what other parents do with DCs between now and starting secondary school.

My DS has got his PS4 back, but beyond gaming and social activities would you recommend any other prep for secondary school?


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2018 2:06 pm 
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Other than supporting him and his school for the rest of year six, no.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2018 2:33 pm 
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anotherdad wrote:
Other than supporting him and his school for the rest of year six, no.

I can live with that!
But the reason why I was asking is because it's clear that DS is getting bored having quite hard for the past few months...


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2018 2:42 pm 
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Do you mean he's bored with school work? If so, tread very carefully. Don't start reading/working/learning ahead because you'll only compound the problem and make him one of those children teachers absolutely love - one that knows it all, or thinks he does.

If he's more generally bored, what's he interested in? Sports, clubs, etc? Anything he can get involved in locally to keep him occupied, try new things and make new friends? Personally I'd have binned the PS4 completely, the things do nothing to help a child's ability to amuse themselves and just become the default activity whenever they've done what they have to do. I've seen it too often with nephews and friends' sons.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2018 2:49 pm 
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anotherdad wrote:
Sports, clubs, etc? Anything he can get involved in locally to keep him occupied, try new things and make new friends?

Second that. Many of the kids in these clubs will be going to the same school. Besides the obvious benefits of exercise, there is the opportunity to meet future school mates. Makes the first day/week/term a lot less daunting.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2018 2:55 pm 
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There's plenty of stuff he could do around the house - some cooking, cleaning etc.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2018 3:07 pm 
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anotherdad wrote:
Do you mean he's bored with school work? If so, tread very carefully. Don't start reading/working/learning ahead because you'll only compound the problem and make him one of those children teachers absolutely love - one that knows it all, or thinks he does.


Thanks anotherdad, this is what I was alluding to. Having had a steep learning curve for past few months he is keen to continue...but in my view there are other things he can focus on to be more rounded and enjoy childhood while he can.

I was concerned that I might be one of the few who doesn't continue with the steep learning curve...but the consensus is reassuring - so thank you all!


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2018 3:16 pm 
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Well, the YouTube ban is over :lol:

We've introduced a homework rota for year 6 - DD's school don't allocate much homework, even in year 6, so homework time is sometimes spent working on guide badges, writing letters to grandparents or reading aloud to her little sister. It's more about time management and self-discipline which I think DD might struggle with in September having left a laid back primary for a grammar. Currently we do 1 hour on a Monday, Wednesday and Thursday and 2 hours on either Saturday/Sunday but to be done in one block.

Otherwise home life is generally quite balanced - three clubs; one structured (girl guides), one sport and one 'just for fun'. Two daily chores (empty the dishwasher and feed the dog), weekly pocket money for a tidy bedroom and as much time spent downstairs with the family as possible (even if we have to endure inane chatter about gummy foods she's seen on Youtube!). We're just trying to enjoy what is possibly the last year of really being a kid.

We're aware that DD has covered the whole Y6 curriculum for maths and English and is confident with most of it so we run the risk of her getting bored. We spoke to class teacher and the school is experienced with this - she said they focus them on 'mastery' tasks and give them 'jobs' that develop their skills- for example my DD is the tuck shop accountant and on the school council.


Last edited by Leighmum2019 on Mon Oct 22, 2018 3:50 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2018 3:17 pm 
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There will be some parents (particularly on this forum) that will go on pushing the academic route all the way, thinking it the only route to success. Your thinking is absolutely right - make sure he has as many experiences as possible and develops a rounded persona. Other posters have made some excellent suggestions. Those will help him succeed more than any amount of academic hot-housing.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2018 4:05 pm 
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I have always told my children two things about boredom. Firstly, that it says more about them than about 'the situation'; and secondly that learning to amuse yourself is good preparation for adult life. If a ten year old is bored then I suggest the focus is too narrow - G55 is right about housework; cooking; learning to sew, knit; learning about the natural world and getting out into it; music, books, compiling the shopping lists etc. Or just lying on his back gazing into space sometimes. All good preparation for time spent alone as an adult.


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