Go to navigation
It is currently Tue Feb 20, 2018 5:23 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 14 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Tue Oct 24, 2017 10:22 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Apr 08, 2014 6:39 pm
Posts: 5
We have liked townley, bexley grammar and tonbridge grammar for our DD. Any views on whether girls do better at all girls or mixed school? Also what if any are the real disadvanatges of IB vs A levels?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Oct 24, 2017 10:50 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 21, 2013 7:59 pm
Posts: 4144
Can I suggest that you search the forum for the many threads about IB vs A levels?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Oct 24, 2017 11:24 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Oct 06, 2017 8:14 pm
Posts: 19
There are a wide range of opinions on the subject of single sex vs co-ed and many of them are valid. I don't think there is any single 'best' option as there are many pros and cons for both.

The research does seem to suggest that academically girls do 'better' at single sex schools (although I can't imagine the difference would be very wide in grammar schools) and certainly the uptake of STEM subjects seems to be better. As a mathematically inclined 11 year old, I went to an all girls school and it was great for me as I was really encouraged and not 'lost' amongst the boys and went on to take a maths degree where I was definitely in the minority! I've looked around quite a few of the mixed schools recently and looked in on quite a few GCSE Computer Science classrooms and have been shocked at the absence of girls (1 girl in the whole year group in one of the schools, 4-5 in another and 9 was the most but that was in a school with an intake of 270). Back in the early 90s when I took my GCSEs at an all girls school, we had a whole class full taking Computer Science as in a girls school there is no such thing as 'subjects for boys' because there aren't any boys around to give that impression!

On the flip side, single sex schools can definitely limit the girls in terms of how they interact with the opposite sex as they have 5-7 years in an environment without boys around whilst they are developing personalities and learning how to get along with people etc. The environment in girls schools can also be much more b*tchy as the boys definitely dilute that element (I much preferred my mixed sixth form from that perspective). I was very awkward with boys for a long time (although studying a male dominated degree and working in the IT sector mean I am now in the opposite environment with very few females around)!

From my perspective, with a son and a daughter - I'm not so keen on single sex for my son, but will certainly consider it in a couple of years for my daughter (as she is like me and strong in maths & science)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Oct 24, 2017 11:30 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 1:21 pm
Posts: 14177
[quote="phina1"] The research does seem to suggest that academically girls do 'better' at single sex schools (although I can't imagine the distance would be very wide in grammar schools) and certainly the uptake of STEM subjects seems to be better. As a mathematically inclined 11 year old, I went to an all girls school and it was great for me as I was really encouraged and not 'lost' amongst the boys and went on to take a maths degree where I was definitely in the minority! I've looked around quite a few of the mixed schools recently and looked in on quite a few GCSE Computer Science classrooms and have been shocked at the absence of girls (1 girl in the whole year group in one of the schools, 4-5 in another and 9 was the most but that was in a school with an intake of 270). Back in the early 90s when I took my GCSEs at an all girls school, we had a whole class full taking Computer Science as in a girls school there is no such thing as 'subjects for boys' because there aren't any boys around to give that impression![quote]
Ah, but I went to a mixed school and loved it - I was never 'lost' among the boys as I was not the only girl taking Maths, Further Maths and Physics. I did a Maths degree and numbers were roughly half and half ...
It's down to the school to ensure both genders have access to all subjects.

A recent Ofsted report stated mixed schools were 'better' ...


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Oct 24, 2017 11:52 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu May 17, 2012 8:39 am
Posts: 1094
Can you please provide a link? I found this, but it’s an opinion without any explanation of how he arrived at it and what evidence underpins it. http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsround/29409738

_________________
Buying online? Please support music at TGS. Thousands of retailers, no cost to you.

Tiffin Girls' School has a designated area; see the determined admissions arrangements. Use the journey planner. Note the Admissions timetable and FAQs.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Oct 24, 2017 12:03 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Oct 06, 2017 8:14 pm
Posts: 19
See Guest55, that's exactly what I meant when I said there were a wide range of opinions and many of them are valid. A lot of it will come down to the individual schools and the child in question as to where they will do best. I don't believe there is a single right answer to this question.

Stroller - I think the Michael Wilmshaw thing was just his own opinion, not based on any in-depth research. I did find this link with lots of other research summarised but it is from a website titled singlesexschools.org so I doubt they show both sides of the story - but it does show a lot of different research studies that evidence children doing better (academically) in single-sex schools:
http://www.singlesexschools.org/researc ... vscoed.htm

As per my original reply though, a school isn't just about academic results and an all girls environment is artificial and doesn't reflect the 'real world', so you have to weigh up the possible benefits of slightly better academic results against their ability to interact with members of the opposite sex (amongst other criteria).


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Oct 24, 2017 12:08 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 1:21 pm
Posts: 14177
See this though:

http://www.alansmithers.com/reports/Par ... ul2006.pdf

"In the few studies where ability has been controlled for, apparent advantages to single-sex or co-education can emerge, but they are small and inconsistent. The comparisons will also have been confounded by differences in, for example, socio-economic status, ethnicity and such school factors as leadership and teacher expertise. While there are some very good girls’ schools and boys’ schools, it does not look as though they are good because they are single-sex."


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Oct 24, 2017 12:15 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Sep 21, 2013 1:56 pm
Posts: 124
I also went to a mixed school and loved it. Similarly I studied more boy-based subjects at A level and Uni and I now work in a more male based environment, although this is rapidly changing (engineering sector). I am convinced that being in a mixed school from early on has really helped.

If it was down to myself and DH (who also went to my school) we would have all our DCs at a mixed school. DS chose differently and this seems to be working for him however when it comes to DC3 (a DD) we will strongly be encouraging her to chose a mixed school. I just can't imagine her in an all girl environment.

All said though, every child is different, what it right for one, isn't necessarily right for the other ...

Good luck!


Last edited by amfnc on Tue Oct 24, 2017 12:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Oct 24, 2017 12:15 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Mar 03, 2014 10:24 pm
Posts: 973
Location: Petts Wood, Bromley, Kent
Not exactly scientific but DD is loving her single sex grammar school. I have friends where DDs went to co-eds with a view that they’d be less bitchy but they've found the opposite. The girls ‘play up’ to the boys and find the boys mark certain girls and divide and rule and create a toxic environment. I am hopeful not all co-Eds are the same. Sport is simpler. DD who I just asked for more reasons why she loves her all-girls school says they can talk frankly about periods which has made the transition to secondary school and womanhood all the easier!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Oct 24, 2017 12:23 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon May 16, 2011 1:05 pm
Posts: 4911
Location: Reading
amfnc wrote:
I also went to a mixed school and loved it. Similarly I studied more boy-based subjects at A level and Uni and I now work in a more male based environment, although this is rapidly changing (engineering sector). I am convinced that being in a mixed school from early on has really helped.

If it was down to myself and DH (who also went to my school) we would have all our DCs at a mixed school. DS chose differently and this seems to be working for him however when it comes to DC3 (a DD) we will strongly be encouraging her to chose a mixed school. I just can't imagine her in an all girl environment.

All said though, every child is different, what it right for one, isn't necessarily right for the other ...

Good luck!


I personally would have hated a girls school. However my DD loves hers and is very happy. I didn’t want her to go to a girls’ school but she did. It is absolutely the right place for her.

As amfnc says, every child and every school is different. There probably are various studies showing the pros and cons of both, but ultimately it is down to what suits yout DC best.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 14 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
CALL 020 8204 5060
   
Privacy Policy | Refund Policy | Disclaimer | Copyright © 2004 – 2018