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PostPosted: Sun Dec 09, 2018 7:42 am 
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At dd2's options evening recently her teachers recommended she go for triple as they feel she is more than capable. However, if she does this her other options will be very limited as they are already committed to taking R.S and an MFL (which is fine by us). Dd would prefer to take the double science award which will enable her to choose another subject.

We are pretty relaxed about her taking double rather than triple. I was wondering if any posters could comment on whether or not they feel this is a good decision or if not, why? my dd is creative and good at languages etc and not really a sciencey type ( like her mother :lol: ...never held me back etc). Any comments will be gratefully received.


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 09, 2018 8:19 am 
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There's been lots about this is the past that probably worth looking at.

From memory the general thoughts were that since many school only offer double science it won't be 'held against you'.

If you aren't focussed on science for future study then double leaves you more breadth, however there is an argument that if you aren't studying it further then doing more at GCSE gives you more knowledge to take forward in life.

If you are likely to carry on with science A level then there is some benefit in triple but its certainly not essential.

I'd say in your DD's case there probably isnt a right or wrong answer so to do what she prefers.

One last thought would be to look at past few years and whether the double science stream gets weaker teachers, which could impact grades.


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 09, 2018 8:20 am 
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If she doesn't want to do science A levels I can't see that there is an issue at all. Even if she does there are plenty of schools who don't offer triple science anyway & students go on to study A levels & degrees in science. There is sometimes a bit of catch up needed at A level, but it doesn't sound as though you think she will go the science route anyway.


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 09, 2018 8:57 am 
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If she isn’t really interested in continuing sciences at A level and wants to be able to choose an other subject at gcse then double science is the way to go.

If she changes her mind it is not a barrier to doing science A levels anyway. My sister is a chem teacher and in the past says some of those that did double out perform some of those that did triple when it comes to A level chemistry.

My DDs sixth form does not prevent those applying to sixth form from elsewhere doing science A levels is they have done double as long as they have done the higher tier, and I think most schools take the same approach these days.


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 09, 2018 9:06 am 
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Thanks everyone that is very reassuring. :)


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 09, 2018 10:41 am 
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+1 to all the comments.
Doing well 7-9 (and in some cases 6) on the double award science should be acceptable to sixth forms to study A level science if she decides she wants to go that route. There is more content to be covered with triple science (an advantage if you are planning to specialise in a science at A level) and there is an argument for some students to do the double award and get 7-9’s rather than the triple and get 6’s across the three, if you understand what I mean.


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 09, 2018 2:28 pm 
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The only caution, I think, is if a student loathes/struggles with one of the three. Ironically, then, I think they should do the triple because each subject is then examined as a standalone, giving the student the ability to, for example, excel in Physics and bomb in Chemistry. The double award is averaged out and so a poor score in one element then drags down the other two.


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 09, 2018 3:09 pm 
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Yes I can see what people mean - I'm hoping her reasonably equal interest/ability in all three will help her gain 7s or thereabouts.


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 14, 2018 11:40 pm 
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Sounds like double is better for her if it is stacked against her preferred choice. Speaking as a scientist, however, I would choose triple if at all possible, if not causing the student to miss out something they wholeheartedly love. It seems more interesting and provides some stretch for the able.


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 15, 2018 2:45 am 
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Both my dds did Triple Science, even though neither of them went on to do any Science A levels.

It was never up for discussion and it is surprising when you look at the GCSE results of various schools just how much double science is listed, especially at selective schools.

I think it has given them an excellent knowledge of the world around and I know both of them will make the same choice again. The actual exams were bite size one hour chunks.

I would advise all those who are interested and can fit it in to do it. DG


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