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PostPosted: Sun Oct 29, 2017 8:21 pm 
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Location: Not in a hole in the ground but in a land where once they dwelt-the Beormingas
I have a ds in y13 who is looking to do an apprenticeship and has decided not to apply to UCAS for a maths degree.
Whilst his apprenticeship is guaranteed 2 years employment, and after two years he can take the graduate route ( this means that he won’t have a degree but will have the same professional qualifications as a graduate), I’m still apprehensive over the thought of him missing the opportunity of doing a maths degree. Some family members have said that he won’t be able to progress as far as a graduate does in a company.

Please could you share your dc’s experiences and your thoughts on the advantages and disadvantages on school leavers doing an apprenticeship over university.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 29, 2017 8:33 pm 
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Location: Reading
What is the professional qualification he will get?

If it is seen as equivalent or better than a degree, I wouldn't expect it to matter. Especially as he will the added bonus of experience, but I think it might depend on the apprenticeship.

Eg In my field most chemical engineers will usually apply for chartered status. The easiest route is with a chem eng degree plus experience. However the IChemE will look at other routes, with other qualifications on merit, so someone could get MIChemE status without a chem eng degree. Harder route but possible.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 29, 2017 8:54 pm 
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Location: Harrow
and a quick aside... if wan't to go to university and do a full degree as well after the apprenticeship then he's more likely to get a better degree then if he goes straight from school.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 29, 2017 9:32 pm 
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I would be concerned about this particular apprenticeship.
The ones I have seen for post A level entry - higher level Apprenticeships - they start studying straight away and end up with a degree, although not necessarily from a top flight university.

I do know with some companies they put the apprentices on routes to fill roles that are less popular with graduate entrants so it's worth checking the details re options and available careers. Of course there is nothing to stop you moving companies but this is probably not a good idea during the apprenticeship.

They will avoid Uni debts and get valuable experience but it's hard work and no long holidays!


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 29, 2017 10:14 pm 
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Joined: Wed Apr 25, 2007 9:08 pm
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Location: Not in a hole in the ground but in a land where once they dwelt-the Beormingas
Thanks for the replies.
I’m not sure which professional qualifications he’ll get. I’ve checked PWC’s webpage and all it says is that it depends on which route career he takes. He wants to go down the Consulting route.
Kb- that’s worrying about how some companies place apprentices. :? He has a good chance of gaining a place at a reputable university to study maths but won’t be able to apply if he signs a contract.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 29, 2017 10:22 pm 
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My DS looked at apprenticeships rather than studying Engineering at uni. He did not find anything that was equivalent to the academic content along with the practical skills.

You need to know what qualification he will get to judge if it is as good as a degree.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 29, 2017 11:03 pm 
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Wh not have a gap year? He can then always apply for an apprenticeship or uni then, there's really no rush to do it now. Sometimes some thinking space is all it needs, it's very easy to get swept along in the application processes when you are not totally sure what you want to do.

My DS is only half a term into his gap year job and already knows that it's what he really wants to do, and in this relatively short period of time I have noticed a marked change in him.

Just a thought.....

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Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit, wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad !


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 30, 2017 8:08 am 
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Joined: Thu Sep 24, 2009 10:59 am
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DIY Mum wrote:
I’m still apprehensive over the thought of him missing the opportunity of doing a maths degree.
Presumably he can decide at any point in the future to go to university.
DIY Mum wrote:
Some family members have said that he won’t be able to progress as far as a graduate does in a company.
How well-informed are these family members? Not very helpful of them to express their opinion in this way unless they are up-to-date experts who can also see into the future.

Personally if one of mine was offered an apprenticeship in the field they knew they wanted to pursue, I would hope they would go for it. It is my view that university degrees will become/are becoming less and less valuable and more and more costly at the same time, and the chance to be earning money while also getting a qualification would be hard to resist. At the same time I think if he is wavering then doodles' idea is a good one, and certainly better than rushing off to university when firstly he is unsure and secondly it is not a benign choice, i.e. it costs a lot in both time and money.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 30, 2017 8:23 am 
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If it's Price Waterhouse Cooper, then they were one of the gold standard Apprenticeship Providers when I was a full time Careers Adviser. Very structured apprenticeship with clear progression - certainly then it was possible to study to degree level alongside (usually part time) - their apprenticeships tended to be administration/finance type ones rather than one with a practical bent (like Engineering) where only a very few organisations can come close to the quality of a degree (often the motor sport/aeronautical industry based ones) - so, unless anything has massively changed, I would be encouraging my son to find out more - the "earn while you learn" mantra is going to become more prevalent as degrees slip further and further back (except for some very specific vocational degrees) in my opinion.

A degree is not suitable for everyone - especially at 18 - there is nothing to stop him starting an apprenticeship - he could look at it as an extended gap year - if he hates it, he can always apply to Uni - there is no limit on the age at which you can take a degree (yes, I know finance changes, but it's hardly a walk in the park at 18!)


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 30, 2017 8:32 am 
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Joined: Thu Sep 24, 2009 10:59 am
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kenyancowgirl wrote:
A degree is not suitable for everyone - especially at 18 -

Yes yes yes!I do wish more people felt this way! University is becoming a nice little earner for everyone except the student at the moment - it is time its value was put under far more scrutiny imho. This article is over a year old now - this 'DD' is one of my favourite people and should be listened to.

https://www.theguardian.com/education/2 ... elay-going


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