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PostPosted: Fri Jun 01, 2018 12:46 am 
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Joined: Wed Apr 25, 2007 9:08 pm
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Location: Not in a hole in the ground but in a land where once they dwelt-the Beormingas
Can anyone offer advice on how to apply for extenuating circumstances for A2 and gcse exams?
It’s been a week since the death of an immediate member of the family, and dd1 who has A2 exams shortly just can’t focus on her study. I’m sure she’ll drop a grade or 2 and will definitely miss her firm and insurance university offers.
Schools are closed so no advice there. And whilst dd2, has sat 11 exams , she still has 13 gcse exams to complete. Can she also apply for extentuating circumstances?
Any advice on how it works, would be greatly appreciated.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 01, 2018 4:52 am 
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Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2012 11:41 am
Posts: 8238
Location: Essex
DIY Mum wrote:
Can anyone offer advice on how to apply for extenuating circumstances for A2 and gcse exams?
It’s been a week since the death of an immediate member of the family, and dd1 who has A2 exams shortly just can’t focus on her study. I’m sure she’ll drop a grade or 2 and will definitely miss her firm and insurance university offers.
Schools are closed so no advice there. And whilst dd2, has sat 11 exams , she still has 13 gcse exams to complete. Can she also apply for extentuating circumstances?
Any advice on how it works, would be greatly appreciated.


How awful for you all :( .

With regard to Special Consideration, this is governed by the JCQ rules, which you can find here:
https://www.jcq.org.uk/exams-office/access-arrangements-and-special-consideration/regulations-and-guidance/a-guide-to-the-special-consideration-process-2017-2018.

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 01, 2018 4:58 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 04, 2008 2:28 pm
Posts: 2931
I'm very sorry to hear of your loss.
We had a similar situation and if it's any reassurance, while DCs were very upset they did manage to focus during the actual exams and thankfully the work they had done previously was enough to carry them through. So the impact might not be as much as you fear.

Applications have to go through the schools' exam officer.
Have you tried contacting the school by email - often at this time of year someone will be monitoring emails even though the school is officially closed.
Otherwise I would call the school(s) first thing on Monday morning.
In the meantime if you have made a note of the details you will have this ready to send through.

There is nothing to stop a student contacting the University department direct to explain the situation in the hope they may be lenient if an offer is missed. In some cases the school may be prepared to do this as well. If the school doesn't have a UCAS officer then the head of 6th form should be able to advise.


I would also contact the children's form tutors to make sure staff are aware and can offer suitable support.

Sending very best wishes to you and your family.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 01, 2018 6:31 am 
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Joined: Wed Mar 04, 2009 2:01 pm
Posts: 8786
Location: Herts
We have had to deal with circumstances impacting my dd's ability to prepare and the school have been fantastic.

The UCAS officer offered to contact her firm and backup University Offers on her behalf and other help was swiftly offered.

I just emailed Head of Sixth form, UCAS Officer and the Exams Officer but also received a response from the Head of Pastoral Care.

I am sure they would all be reading their email at this very critical time for their students. I would email Head of Year and Form tutor for your Y11 dd. DG


Last edited by Daogroupie on Fri Jun 01, 2018 8:53 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 01, 2018 6:46 am 
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Joined: Mon Oct 21, 2013 7:59 pm
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Extenuating circumstances for exams have to go through the Exams Officer as it is they, and only they, who are allowed to approach the Exam boards on your behalf. You may wish to cc the Pastoral Head or Head of Year in as well but they would only take the information to the Exams Officer anyway and, as your child is probably on exam leave now, the two heads will barely see them.

I have never heard of an exams officer contacting the Universities for a student - it doesn't make sense to me as, if the exam board are aware, via the EC route, they make any borderline adjustments for the student before the Universities hear the grade - and the Exams Officer does not have contact with Universities directly - only the person in charge of UCAS in your school would - I wonder if the exams officer was just saying that to reassure you DG?

DIY Mum - try and reassure your girls that they can still do their best - I have been asked to keep an eye on lots of children sitting exams and, although I am aware of them, they do not know I am doing this and without exception they all focus really well in the hall - and are often smiling with their friends afterwards - kids are super resilient! This is exactly the sort of thing exam boards are prepared for and is a cast iron extenuating circumstance reason - (some of the extenuating circumstances offered by parents can be a bit ropey!)


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 01, 2018 7:17 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 04, 2008 2:28 pm
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The exam boards can make adjustments but they are limited to a relatively small percentage of marks.
A University can firm an offer even if a student has been badly impacted and grades are significantly off the expected level.

In any case the school may wish to explain if there is a big gap between predictions and actual results as it reflects badly on them if there isn't a reason for it.

It depends very much on the school and who the offers are with but sometimes staff have developed good relationships that would allow them to make more informal contact on behalf of a student.

As others have said as well, it's definitely worth sending off an email first thing - primarily to Exams officer but I'm sure in the circumstances other staff won't object to being copied in.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 01, 2018 8:44 am 
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Location: Reading
I think the School contacting the universitys she has offers from will be worth doing. They can then take it into account if she misses the grades.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 01, 2018 8:55 am 
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Location: Herts
Sorry, it was the UCAS Officer. I had so many email responses to my one email I lost track!

I have amended my post. DG


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 01, 2018 9:23 am 
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That makes more sense...it would have been well outside the Exams Officer's remit to do that!


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 01, 2018 9:29 am 
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Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 1:21 pm
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Sorry to hear about your loss. It's better if the school writes to the firm/insurance universities rather than your daughter as that will carry more weight.

Universities get A level results the weekend before students do so they can consider the results in the light of this information.


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