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PostPosted: Sat Aug 04, 2018 10:25 am 
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I bet you didn't need AAA or better though - that's the difference.

Schools will be blamed these days when grades aren't reached - no wonder they give guidance.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 04, 2018 10:55 am 
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Guest55 wrote:
I bet you didn't need AAA or better though - that's the difference.

No - BBB. Grade inflation and easier exams came into the picture rather later ...


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 04, 2018 11:06 am 
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Those days have gone and it was not students that introduced modular A levels - you can only sit the exams that are set for you. I actually prefer the modular approach as it's more like uni.

I think the understanding demanded is just as, if not more, rigorous and remember grades are awarded in a different way now [criterion referenced] and not 'restricted' by quotas as they were before.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 04, 2018 12:28 pm 
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Grades and qualifications are deeply dull and often fungible. In paid employment, communication skills and self-awareness differentiate; learning how to get on with other people is immensely valuable. I strongly encourage teenagers to get that experience of paid work so they can learn how to deal with others early in life.

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 04, 2018 12:31 pm 
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No-one is saying no paid work - just be sensible and keep the hours low.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 04, 2018 7:08 pm 
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Guest55 wrote:
I bet you didn't need AAA or better though - that's the difference.

Schools will be blamed these days when grades aren't reached - no wonder they give guidance.


I wonder if this is one reason, as a teacher and parent, we are seeing such a rise in mental health problems amongst young people.

'Bedroom boys' was a phrase used at a conference I attended recently. I think anything that gives young people a few hours away from their books, phones and talking to people in the real world is a good thing, be this a part-time job, sport or any other social activity.

Life is more than grades and the pressure parents, schools but mainly the young people themselves put on each other to achieve top grades above all else in life is worrying.


Last edited by Blitz on Wed Aug 08, 2018 7:59 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2018 9:44 pm 
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Joined: Fri Mar 04, 2011 3:32 pm
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+1 Blitz

My DC felt she had no choice but to work one full day a week and extra in holidays throughout year 12 in order to rack up required work experience for the particular Uni course application. For no money either. On one hand, I feel it did her a world of good. But she was very extremely over stressed in year 13 despite giving that up (and most everything else). So now with hindsight she feels it was too much, and may have damaged her grades, in fact she enjoyed the work so much more than the masses of course material to get through.

At 16, she had no way of judging the situation, and our experience as adults did help as we advised her to delay some other plans and in the end I.e. assisted her more with transport to save time. A-level content is very very over the top and way beyond what I and DH did in a good University and A levels were much harder exams both in question style and overall exam format. Her obvious enthusiasm for the actual work is all that stopped me from begging her to apply for a different course. Not that my opinion carries much weight!

I will be advising second DC and parent friends who ask me, that they do if they wish, a very limited number of working hours preferably in something relevant to their career or academic interests, up to year 13. Then, stop. And prioritise having a holiday in the summer before year 13- missing that due to work was really annoying.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 15, 2018 11:38 am 
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Reading this with interest as dd will start Sixth Form in September and currently has a job which when not on holiday has been doing 2 - 3 shifts per week, roughly 6 hours each.

I'm thinking along the lines of one evening and one day at the weekend max in term time. She already dances 3 times a week. Luckily lessons are held at her current school so no travelling involved. Work is also a short walk into town so hopefully she'll cope ok. I'm sure once she starts, if it's too much she can cut down.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 18, 2018 4:00 pm 
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Joined: Wed Dec 01, 2010 10:57 am
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I was pondering this a few months back, and I agree it should be the student’s choice. Our daughter loved her job, and loved the spending power it afforded her. She has worked since she was 15, and nobody was going to tell her otherwise. Her school were very anti-work in upper 6th, and she was the only one of her class who continued to work. At 18 hours a week, and an extra 10 or so with babysitting jobs on top, I have to admit I was slightly apprehensive. Especially with her other interests, and a hugely sociable diary on top!
However, she managed to exceed her grade requirements, and in fact did far better than many of her peers. I think it’s a vital skill to be able to juggle the demands of work, social and academic life. It will stand her in good stead in the long run.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 18, 2018 6:15 pm 
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Joined: Thu Sep 24, 2009 11:59 am
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I have discouraged working during sixth form here because personally I think it is too much, though all have carried on with voluntary work. It is entirely up to the young person and the family I think, but I said to mine that this is such a short period of your life and so much hinges on it that it might be better to prioritise leisure and study. I think they only took my advice because they also quite like being able to veg out a bit in their free time.


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