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PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2018 9:51 am 
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My DD has just gone to university having also done IB and I would say the offers were comparable for A level vs IB (or in some cases lower for IB). That said, you are not comparing like with like so it’s difficult to compare. The courses she applied for were mostly asking for AAB at A level whereas IB offers were 33-36 with either 665 or 655 at HL. One of her offers (Exeter) was 32 if she “firmed” them (which she didn't).


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2018 1:22 pm 
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Joined: Tue Sep 03, 2013 9:59 am
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Thanks Bondgirl,
His Maths teacher has now confirmed that the IB higher Maths is harder than A level Maths. I didn’t expect an answer at the weekend, though!
So, in theory, universities should adjust their requirements accordingly. I’ll see whether this does happen in practice!

Salsa


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2018 1:53 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 1:21 pm
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It won't - this is the risk of doing the IB.


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2018 2:41 pm 
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My view is that the IB is a far better qualification than A levels but that universities do not handle it at all well or consistently. The organisation linked to below has carried out research which shows that:
Quote:
there is a general trend towards UK universities being tougher with their admission requirements for IB humanities students, versus their A-level counterparts studying for the same subject group.
and
Quote:
when it comes to IB applicants looking to study STEM subjects at UK universities, entry requirements are somewhat more lenient.
which would suggest reassurance for the OP.

https://bridge-u.com/blog/uk-universiti ... -students/

I don't think the English education system is ready for IB, to be honest, even though it equips young people far more effectively for a changing future than 3 A levels will. If you sit it, you are going to be better educated in the widest sense of the word than A level students, but may be entering an uncertain university market. Sir Anthony Seldon, who is like marmite (and I am not so much of a fan, but agree on this) writes rather sensibly on the matter and has been a vocal exponent. His views are summed up here.

https://www.tes.com/news/world-needs-in ... calaureate


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2018 2:44 pm 
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I agree but with STEM schools tend not to offer the 'right' combination to make them a strong candidate e.g. the lack of Further Maths.


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2018 2:49 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2008 3:02 pm
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Location: S E London
I'm interested that your son can study physics, computer science and DT, as they all come under the science option. I thought you could either study one subject from each of the 6 areas, or two from one area, but drop the creative arts subject. Has it changed?


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 12:28 am 
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@ Amber, thanks for taking the trouble to give me such a detailed response. It’s reassuring. I’ll keep researching courses and requirements.

@ 2childmum, at DGS you can choose another Science, language or humanities instead of a subject from the arts block. I’m not sure if this is the same at all schools offering the IB.
My son is still not sure. He’s an all rounder and would also be happy to choose from that group, however, we have to research universities’ requirements and work backwards!

Salsa


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 11:07 am 
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Location: S E London
You seem to be saying that he can do 3 science subject (physics, computer science and DT), but I thought you could only do two (by dropping one of the arts subjects). Or have I misunderstood?

DS looked at the IB and was quite interested as he would have liked to carry on history and english literature, but he wanted to do two sciences and music (which he would have had to drop to do the two sciences). If he could have dropped the language he might well have gone the IB route, but in the end decided to stick with A levels.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 11:40 am 
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2childmum wrote:
You seem to be saying that he can do 3 science subject (physics, computer science and DT), but I thought you could only do two (by dropping one of the arts subjects). Or have I misunderstood?

DS looked at the IB and was quite interested as he would have liked to carry on history and english literature, but he wanted to do two sciences and music (which he would have had to drop to do the two sciences). If he could have dropped the language he might well have gone the IB route, but in the end decided to stick with A levels.


As it stands, my son could do Higher Maths, Higher Physics and either Higher DT or Higher Computer Science. The specification also says that you have to do minimum 3 at higher level, which would indicate that you could do a 4th. You are right that as it stands, he could not do Physics, DT and Computer Science as they are from the same group.

Salsa


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 12:46 pm 
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Joined: Tue Oct 18, 2011 11:38 pm
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Mathematics

It is a requirement of the programme that students study at least one course in mathematics; computer science is an elective.


Four courses in mathematics are available:
•mathematical studies standard level
•mathematics SL
•mathematics higher level
further mathematics higher level

These four courses serve to accommodate the range of needs, interests and abilities of students, and to fulfill the requirements of various university and career aspirations.

The aims of these courses are to enable students to:
•develop mathematical knowledge, concepts and principles
•develop logical, critical and creative thinking
•employ and refine their powers of abstraction and generalization.

Just notice there HL Further Maths for the IB but not sure whether schools offer that in the UK?


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