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PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2018 10:06 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jun 28, 2018 1:18 pm
Posts: 69
As the results loom closer, I'm just pondering this. I can see two definite sides. On the one hand, I can see that if children know their scores, it could encourage a kind of one-upmanship within a school (ie not just 'I passed you didn't', but 'I got a better score than you'). And if your child has got a very low score, I can see that they might get upset and demoralised to find out how they did. But on the other hand, if I'd worked really hard for months for a test, I'd be quite peeved if I didn't get to find out what my score was. Would be very interested to hear what others have done or are planning to do.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2018 10:11 pm 
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To this day my daughter doesn't know her 11+ score (not qualified) or her 12+ score (qualified). It made no difference in either case and it was easy for her to rebuff any questions about them because she didn't know herself. We parents were quizzed by other parents but they were told it was none of their business. Even my parents have no idea.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2018 7:38 am 
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Joined: Mon Mar 07, 2011 6:25 pm
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I have three children all at grammar. I told my first dc who did extremely well but regretted how they all competed at school. Didn’t tell the other two - just said they’d done really well and they should be proud of how hard they had worked. They did argue that they wanted to know but I believe they were secretly relieved they could not take part in any classroom arguing. They both went to TGS so they know they scored highly. Think many of my third child’s friends didn’t know either as many intents seemed to adopt this idea at the primary school then. I always said I’d tell them after they got into year 7 and when I did tell them, they weren’t that bothered anymore.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2018 9:00 am 
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Joined: Thu Sep 24, 2009 11:59 am
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I think it may depend on the child and the area. My younger son saw me open the email because it came really early and had no indication that it contained the results - I thought it was some kind of notice about the results coming later. Because of the way the results are standardised against cohort, it transpired that for one school he had scored two points lower than his only classmate who also took the test; and for the other schools he had scored between one and three points higher!

When my older son took the test (he missed by one mark) there was a bit of nastiness, with one successful child being really unpleasant ('I used to think you were clever, haha, but obviously you're not). Like anotherdad's daughter, my son joined the school after an in year test in Y8 and no score was actually given so it wasn't an issue.

On balance I think no - if they have passed then that is enough, and the risks to feelings of themselves or others are greater than those attached to not knowing exactly how well you did. It makes zero difference in the end anyway, and the higher scorers are rarely those who do better in the end - almost the reverse actually with many who creep in later or get in on borderline appeals being those who do best at GCSE and A level (I have lots of anecdotal evidence for this).


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2018 10:05 am 
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Joined: Sun Mar 07, 2010 12:39 am
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When DS did the tests years ago, no score was given, at least not for our preferred schools. I think you had to request it. We still don’t know what his scores were for the two tests, mainly because I knew I’d be tempted to compare his results with DD’s. As it turned out, she didn’t actually do any tests as we opted for the school with a sibling policy (not the sole reason for our choice).


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2018 10:32 am 
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Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2018 11:45 pm
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Our primary school has a year 6 assembly on the day the results come out and tell the children to be sensitive to others feelings. They are told some of you will be overjoyed and some will be devastated so they need to respect each others privacy and be gentle. They have extra teachers on the playground for a few days to ensure the kids aren't boasting or teasing and it seems to work. Surprisingly the kids don't ask each other what scores they got and they are very good with each other (even though I am desperate to know what everyone scored!)

Because it is well managed at school I did tell my son his score and will be telling my daughter next week. After all, like you said they have worked really hard for the 11+ for about a year and deserve to know their hard work has paid off.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2018 11:53 am 
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Joined: Fri May 02, 2014 6:16 pm
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I didn't until the school year finished, because she got the highest score in the year and I didn't want her boasting or getting big headed. You can work out where your child is within the school year by reading charts released as part of Freedom of Information requests.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2018 9:55 pm 
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Joined: Mon Oct 03, 2011 2:06 pm
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None of my three knew their scores, no need and they didn't ask. I certainly didn't discuss them with other parents. I just told the children they'd done enough for their chosen schools. They also had some reminders how to treat others at school. For one we happened to be a little late into school and the way some other children (who has 'passed') was dreadful. Kindness and empathy are more important than a score.

A friend of mine took her child out for dinner the night before GCSE results to celebrate all their hard work and effort. It's definitely something we'll consider in future rather than on results night.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2018 7:31 am 
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Joined: Sat Jul 02, 2016 3:44 pm
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Location: London Borough of Bexley
I did tell my child his score but only because we were in the queue to pick his sibling up (with no other year 6 kids around) and he didn't want me to tell him the result then , but as it was good news I wanted to get it out of the way ASAP as I knew we might encounter people on the way out of the school grounds. I suggest with a smile that he read the email on my phone, which he did, but looked confused so I pointed to the pass mark then pointed to his score. He probably doesn't remember it. (I'm glad I told him then as we then got collared by the "we've passed" parent brigade when we left the infants who hadn't even got around to telling their own kids yet. :roll: ) This is for the Bexley test. For the Kent test results we will be at home, so no need for discretion. I will just tell him if he's passed or not.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2018 9:04 am 
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Joined: Thu Jun 28, 2018 1:18 pm
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Thanks all, that's really helpful. I think I might go for the strategy of not telling him his scores now, but promising to tell him at a later date (if he still wants to know!). I think I might also discuss with him how his performance in different papers compared (e.g. better in English, less well in Maths or whatever), as we're working towards another entrance exam now, and it will be helpful to look at which areas he needs to focus on more.


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