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 Post subject: Reading classics
PostPosted: Mon Oct 02, 2017 10:35 am 
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Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2017 9:48 am
Posts: 11
Hi all,

DD is an avid reader. She loves to read but only problem is she has no interest in classic books. I tried getting her to read it. She says it's too boring. She read Harry Potter series very enthusiastically. How can I encourage her to read classics? She has a kindle, so she can easily look up words she doesn't know. Any tips would be appreciated.

Thanks


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 Post subject: Re: Reading classics
PostPosted: Mon Oct 02, 2017 1:35 pm 
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Joined: Thu Oct 20, 2016 7:32 pm
Posts: 109
What about starting with the simpler versions e.g. Usborne and then that may spark her interest in the full version?

Also have you tried reading them with her?


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 Post subject: Re: Reading classics
PostPosted: Mon Oct 02, 2017 1:44 pm 
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Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2016 5:02 pm
Posts: 600
tahm563 wrote:
Hi all,

DD is an avid reader. She loves to read but only problem is she has no interest in classic books. I tried getting her to read it. She says it's too boring. She read Harry Potter series very enthusiastically. How can I encourage her to read classics? She has a kindle, so she can easily look up words she doesn't know. Any tips would be appreciated.

Thanks


Why do you want her to read 'classics'? What is your definition of a classic book - do you just mean old? Are you worried about her vocabulary, or do you just think they is something that she 'should' like?

All readers will find some classics boring - a child who likes, say, Philip Pullman might also like Tolkein or CS Lewis but probably not like Black Beauty or Ballet Shoes. Try to find classics at least in the same genre of books that she already likes, or which focus on the same sort of things. If she likes HP because of the wizardry, then try some fantasy works. If she likes the story of an underdog schoolboy hero, she might like something like A Kestrel for a Knave.

I have one child who breathes books for sustenance and another who doesn't pick them up without bribery/coercion. Be delighted that your child enjoys books. I'm not sure it matters so much about what they're reading.


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 Post subject: Re: Reading classics
PostPosted: Mon Oct 02, 2017 10:58 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2017 9:48 am
Posts: 11
I want to encourage her to read slightly more difficult/challenging books to help expand her vocab and improve creative writing. Yes I used to read to her often until last year. Now have a baby and I also work. Usually exhausted by 9 pm to read. But this is no excuse, just explaining the reality of things at home.

Streathammum thanks for your advice. I wasn't much into harry potter myself as a child. Would be grateful if you can suggest similar story lines. Thanks.


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 Post subject: Re: Reading classics
PostPosted: Tue Oct 03, 2017 7:25 am 
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Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2010 2:45 pm
Posts: 5406
How old is your daughter? Harry Potter has only been around for 20 years - written just in time for my DD! Something mine all enjoyed were the Series of Unfortunate Events (although a lot if people don't like them because the vocabulary is very American). Depending on her age (sorry if you've said, I missed it), I would definitely recommend the Philip Pullman trilogy.


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 Post subject: Re: Reading classics
PostPosted: Tue Oct 03, 2017 7:27 am 
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Joined: Thu Nov 27, 2014 4:04 pm
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Tahm how old is your dd? I am sure several of us can give recommendations of titles that our dd's liked at that age (I have one who reads constantly but did not like a lot of the traditional classics).


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 Post subject: Re: Reading classics
PostPosted: Tue Oct 03, 2017 9:02 am 
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Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2016 5:02 pm
Posts: 600
tahm563 wrote:
I want to encourage her to read slightly more difficult/challenging books to help expand her vocab and improve creative writing.


In my experience, if a child finds a book difficult or challenging, they probably won't enjoy it. Reading it will be a bit of a chore - more like homework than reading for pleasure.

By all means encourage your child to stretch herself in her reading, and make sure that she has access to different styles and genres - she may find she likes books she didn't expect to. However, when she's reading things she finds difficult or challenging, treat this as part of her "work", not her downtime.


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 Post subject: Re: Reading classics
PostPosted: Tue Oct 03, 2017 9:16 am 
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Joined: Wed Sep 02, 2015 9:56 am
Posts: 61
This rings a bell :)

I'm of the opinion that reading anything is better than reading nothing. I gave up pushing "classics" and instead recommended books in the genre DS was interested in. We made (and still do) good use of the school/local library. He devoured anything with fighting/battles and read (in hindsight) some unsuitable books for his age but his reading stamina and vocabulary greatly improved. The key is to make sure they are at the right reading level. He's currently enjoying LOTR because he's ready now. If I'd pushed that earlier, it would have been pointless.

There are some fantastic books out there that are quite new and easy to digest. The Maze Runner and Hunger Games spring to mind. Assuming your daughter is a suitable age.


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 Post subject: Re: Reading classics
PostPosted: Tue Oct 03, 2017 6:32 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2012 11:41 am
Posts: 6770
Location: Essex
RedPanda wrote:
This rings a bell :)

I'm of the opinion that reading anything is better than reading nothing. I gave up pushing "classics" and instead recommended books in the genre DS was interested in. We made (and still do) good use of the school/local library. He devoured anything with fighting/battles and read (in hindsight) some unsuitable books for his age but his reading stamina and vocabulary greatly improved. The key is to make sure they are at the right reading level. He's currently enjoying LOTR because he's ready now. If I'd pushed that earlier, it would have been pointless.

There are some fantastic books out there that are quite new and easy to digest. The Maze Runner and Hunger Games spring to mind. Assuming your daughter is a suitable age.


DS2 read the Hunger Games trilogy at the age of nine. All in the space of a week.

Far better to be reading something enjoyable at this age, which in turn encourages the habit of reading, than being forced to plough through more 'worthy' books, which may just kill it.

_________________
Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read.Groucho Marx


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 Post subject: Re: Reading classics
PostPosted: Tue Oct 17, 2017 9:11 am 
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Joined: Sat Nov 28, 2015 10:56 pm
Posts: 58
I just randomly add books to DD's kindle, she gets round to them sooner or later! Classics are easy to add because they're often free or v cheap on the kindle store.

She has enjoyed:
5 Children and It (and sequels)
Ballet Shoes/White Boots/Tennis Shoes/etc
The Demon Headmaster
The Indian in the Cupboard
Anne of Green Gables (and sequels, she's read all of them)
What Katy Did/Next/At School
The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe series
The Wind in the Willows
The Little Princess
The Secret Garden
The Prince and the Pauper
The Lost Prince
Mary Poppins
Marianne Dreams
Heidi
Alice in Wonderland

They're all children's classics I'd say, and definitely have a fairly rich vocabulary compared to many more recent books. DD has also more recently (now in year 6) moved on and read Little Women, Pride and Prejudice, A Christmas Carol which has surprised me but she claims to have enjoyed them. The children's classics definitely increased her reading stamina, and the ability to highlight words to get a definition has helped a lot.


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