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PostPosted: Fri Nov 10, 2017 5:51 pm 
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How does doing a GCSE with reasonable score compare with GCSE in MFL?
Will it be rated low because a degree of proficiency in native language is expected?

How do unis rate this in their application ?


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 10, 2017 7:39 pm 
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Some will ignore any qualification in your native language. Look on uni websites for their specific rules.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 10, 2017 8:07 pm 
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Location: East Kent
Good advice.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 2:14 pm 
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All the students I know of who have done a Native language GCSE have done this outside of school usually in Y10 and then also done the MFL at school. DG


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 3:21 pm 
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If it is a native language GCSE I would suggest doing it as an extra rather than in place of another GCSE . My daughter did one at the end of year 9 and my son will do the same. The exam was sat at school but any prep required was done at home, if it is a native language GCSE I imagine preparation will be minimal. The only reason we did it is because it is sometimes better to have a piece of paper that says you can do something.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 4:05 pm 
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What if the 'native language' happens to be one of the standard MFL GCSE's taught at the school such as French or Spanish? Should the child be discouraged from taking this as an option?

What counts as a native language anyway? If you're born and raised in the UK but have a foreign parent(s) and can therefore speak another language relatively fluently would this count as 'native'.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 10:54 pm 
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Good question! I’d also like to know.
Many children learn to understand their parents, but are unable to speak, write or read fluently in their parents’ language. Some others, however, put a lot of effort through work at home and/or school at weekends. I think it would be nice to have a formal qualification and an official recognition of this effort. Moreover, as an employer it would be nice to know that a certain level has been achieved.

Salsa


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2017 9:01 am 
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Surferfish wrote:
What if the 'native language' happens to be one of the standard MFL GCSE's taught at the school such as French or Spanish? Should the child be discouraged from taking this as an option?


If they have a certain level of proficiency in the language then it is a waste of their time going to class at school as they will be bored, by all means take it as an option, as in, exam only. I am sure most schools would support this by supplying past papers help with exam technique etc. my daughter did practice exams at home which she took into school to be marked so the school could see she was on track, if they spotted any areas she was weak in they recommended a bit of extra work.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2017 9:12 am 
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Glad to hear that the school was supportive. However, will this GCSE be "valued" in the same way as if she did not have parents who spoke the language?

I do know of children who spoke the language, but could not write it properly so they went to lessons. They did get bored, but had that subject as an easy one and scored top marks. These GCSEs were included in their list of qualifying GCSEs for their 6th Form entry. In the case of someone taking it externally, would the GCSE have the same value? Could it be used to apply for the 6th Form somewhere? Or would people discard it as it was a heritage language and thus considered an easy qualification to obtain?

Salsa


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2017 9:12 am 
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salsa wrote:
I think it would be nice to have a formal qualification and an official recognition of this effort. Moreover, as an employer it would be nice to know that a certain level has been achieved.Salsa
I speak/read etc several languages to varying degrees of fluency but only have formal qualifications in three of them. On my CV I just put a section for 'languages spoken' with an idea of the level of proficiency that I have - e.g. 'fluent reader, good level of spoken language'. It has never been an issue with employers.

PS - the level of proficiency demonstrated by a GCSE is going to be far far lower than that of a bilingual child; doing a GCSE is not only a waste of that child's time imho but probably makes it look as if you have only done it to put on a list of qualifications. We don't need a certificate for everything in life, not yet at least!


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