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PostPosted: Tue Apr 30, 2019 4:14 pm 
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A few years ago now, Langley Grammar recognised that by taking only the highest scoring children, their pupil’s journey time was very long and it was creating a high-pressure environment for the children who did go to school (more akin to a superselective). Many bright local applicants were unable to gain access unless they gained a super-high score themselves so there were hardly any children able to walk/cycle to the school, and few could manage afterschool commitments.

So they changed their admission criteria (and kudos to the governors who were brave enough to make this decision) initially so that there was a “local area” where Langley/colnbrook applicants were prioritised, and more recently there is a (more sensible) double area where children from about 1-6 miles (area based) can also get a place, though there is still ranking.

My question, if anyone here knows: what effect has this had on the character of Langley Grammar as a school? Is it friendlier? Less pressurised? More diverse? Does it feel like a positive learning environment for the children? Would a child with emotional sensitivity or SEN be well supported there?

(Conversely, it now seems to be Upton who have the most out-of-area targetting: is the flip side that the learning atmosphere has changed there?


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 30, 2019 4:17 pm 
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How long ago is "a few years"? General perception is that it takes a school cohort to make a radical change felt (ie a year group moving from Y7-11 or 13 depending on the school's reach), so it could be too early to tell if there is a fundamental change in the ethos, possibly?


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 30, 2019 4:34 pm 
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Checking on this forum’s old threads, it looks like March 2016 for places in Sept 2016 was the first to apply a “local/general” area. So I take your point, only three years later there may not be an obvious change. I’m interested because I have a younger child who is still only in year2, of course it’s not relevent yet, but we got an impression of the school as very pressurised when we visited for my older DD, I am just curious whether the change has had a positive impact! I don’t mind at all if the astronomical pass rates have dropped by a micrograde or two, if it’s a happier learning environment....


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PostPosted: Wed May 08, 2019 3:06 pm 
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Aethel wrote:
My question, if anyone here knows: what effect has this had on the character of Langley Grammar as a school? Is it friendlier? Less pressurised? More diverse? Does it feel like a positive learning environment for the children? Would a child with emotional sensitivity or SEN be well supported there?

(Conversely, it now seems to be Upton who have the most out-of-area targetting: is the flip side that the learning atmosphere has changed there?

Hello Aethel
This is just my opinion. I have no first hand experience of the Slough Schools.
I don't see why the school environment would be any less pressurised just because it has a catchment / priority area now. As you say, the students in these catchment / priority areas are as bright as the ones that had to travel a long way to school. Unless there is pressure from the parents on the school to address this and/or the governing board has made a decision to address the situation, I don't personally see any change to the pressured (or not) atmposphere at school.

The catchement / priority area for Langley is as diverse (or not - I am assuming that you are referring to ethinc diversity. I apologise if that is not the case.) as the neighbouring boroughs of Hounslow and Reading; so again I don't see much changes in terms of diversity.

Regards


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PostPosted: Fri May 10, 2019 9:08 pm 
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hi Square.
No, I didn’t mean ethnic diversity, we have a great multinational population here in Slough, and that’s reflected in all of the schools (though there is an underrepresentation of White British children in some of the Slough Grammars proprtionally, as there is less cultural pressure to intensively tutor. the exception there is St Bernard’s simply because a higher proprtion of local Catholics are White British, Irish and European).

I meant diversity of interests/types of student personality . Our impression from talking to several former pupils of LGS was that it has been very academically pressurised and children who have not fit the mould of the “obedient perfect student” have found things difficult and sometimes move schools. it has been common for children there to have extra tuition all through the school, and for stress to be common (they have several school counsellors to cope with the demand apparently).

I have a vested interest here as I have a younger DS who’s able and rather musical-a strength at LGS- , but he’s quite a sensitive type and I’m trying to gently ascertain whether LGS may suit him later on if it has a higher intake of more local children rather than the very highest-performing children with long commutes, and whether the school is improving its pastoral care given that not all the children now there are the super-elite-high-scorers.


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